Curbing academic predators: JoTT’s policy regarding citation of publications from predatory journals

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Rajeev Raghavan
Neelesh Dahanukar
Sanjay Molur

Abstract

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How to Cite
[1]
Raghavan, R., Dahanukar, N. and Molur, S. 2015. Curbing academic predators: JoTT’s policy regarding citation of publications from predatory journals. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 7, 10 (Aug. 2015), 7609–7611. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o4388.7609-11.
Section
Editorial

References

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