Key Biodiversity Areas identification in Japan Hotspot

Main Article Content

Y. Natori
M. Kohri
S. Hayama
N. De Silva

Abstract

Priority sites within Japan Hotspot were identified using Key Biodiversity Area (KBA) criteria, based on vulnerability and irreplaceability. The identification process considered 217 trigger species from mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, freshwater and brackish water fishes and odonates, and focused on identifying gaps in Japan’s protected-area system. We identified 228 sites as KBAs and 50 rivers as candidate KBAs. Collectively, KBAs occupy 18% of the land, about half is not protected. Sites selected include natural and semi-natural environments, and appropriate form of protection is site-dependent. Twenty percent of Japanese terrestrial area is already protected, although to varying degrees, but additional 8% should also receive protection or proper management to strengthen the conservation of biodiversity in Japan.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Natori, Y., Kohri, M., Hayama, S. and De Silva, N. 2012. Key Biodiversity Areas identification in Japan Hotspot. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 4, 8 (Aug. 2012), 2797–2805. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o2999.2797-805.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

Y. Natori

Yoji Natori is the Ecosystem Policy Manager at Conservation International Japan. His current responsibilities include national and international biodiversity policy, management of a forest restoration project, and mainstreaming of biodiversity into society including the outreach of KBA. He led the study and preparation of the manuscript.

M. Kohri

Mari Kohri is currently a researcher at Tokyo Metropolitan University and the principal investigator of a Grant-in-Aid project, “Developing a mapping method for selecting biodiversity conservation priority area and for invasive species measures in the oceanic islands†from Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology. She supported the process as a consultant to CI, and collected distribution information of KBA trigger species to produce draft KBA mapping.

S. Hayama

Seiji Hayama is the Head of Nature Conservation Office, Wild Bird Society of Japan. He is involved in conservation, monitoring and research in IBA sites. He also conducts lobbying activities. He provided information on IBAs to facilitate the KBA identification process.

N. De Silva

Naamal De Silva is the Director of Conservation Priorities and Outreach at Conservation International. With background in identifying globally significant sites for biodiversity conservation, her current role includes developing CI’s institutional framework for identifying geographic priorities and helping to link science staff in CI headquarters with technical staff in the field. She advised the study by providing her experiences in the similar exercises in other countries.

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