Mandibular structure, gut contents analysis and feeding group of orthopteran species collected from different habitats of Satoyama area within Kanazawa City, Japan

Main Article Content

S.A. ElEla
W. ElSayed
K. Nakamura

Abstract

In a survey of orthopteran assemblages from different habitats of Satoyama area, Kanazawa City, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, 50 different species belonging to 10 families representing 17 subfamilies and 27 tribes were recorded. Seven feeding groups were proposed based on stereo microscopic examination of mandibular morphology and analysis of gut contents. Among the examined subfamilies, family Tettigonidae proved to be the most diverse in term of mandible types, with four feeding groups. This was followed by family Acrididae, which also possessed a variety of mandibular structures with three feeding groups. Other families contained only single feeding groups. It was noted that only five species were graminivorous, all were from the family Acrididae, with mandibles characterized by very short incisors and relatively wide molar regions. The gut contents of these five species contained more than 80% monocotyledonous plant species.

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How to Cite
[1]
ElEla, S., ElSayed, W. and Nakamura, K. 2010. Mandibular structure, gut contents analysis and feeding group of orthopteran species collected from different habitats of Satoyama area within Kanazawa City, Japan. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 2, 5 (May 2010), 849–857. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o2346.849-57.
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Articles
Author Biographies

S.A. ElEla

S. Abu ElElA is currently monitoring the changes in the diversity of orthopteran species in selected areas of Japan especially areas suffering from abandonment or anthropogenic stress.

W. ElSayed

W. ElSAyEd, a Research Scholar, is working on biodiversity, population ecology and mathematical models. He has monitored changes in Satoyama area using carabid beetles as bioindicator species with the use of different mathematical and theoretical approaches.

K. Nakamura

K. NAKAmurA is the Director of Biodiversity laboratory in Kanazawa University, Kanazawa City, Japan; and currently is one of the committee responsible for establishing a network for sustainable biodiversity in Japan. Also, he guides Ph.D. students and is involved in researches concerning land restoration practices.