Comparative phytosociological assessment of three terrestrial ecosystems of Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India

Main Article Content

M. Vishnu Chandran
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3626-0448
S. Gopakumar
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2841-5414
Anoopa Mathews
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8943-2739

Abstract

Phytosociological studies were conducted in three vegetation types in the WS II area of Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary.  In each vegetation type, 85 quadrats (10 x 10 m) were laid to quantify the vegetation.  Natural forest showed comparatively higher species richness than plantation and vayal (swamps/low lying grassland).  In natural forest 96 plant species were present while it was 70 and 66 respectively in plantation and vayal.  Fabaceae was the dominant family in all the three vegetation types.  The natural forest was dominated by Chromolaena odorata, followed by Lantana camara, Mimosa pudica, Terminalia elliptica, Glycosmis pentaphylla.  In the plantations, Chromolaena odorata, Tectona grandis, Mimosa pudica and Glycosmis pentaphylla showed dominance.  The vayal was dominated by Arundinella leptochloa.  The second most dominant species in the vayal was Chromolaena odorata.  Other dominant species were Kyllinga nemoralis and Sporobolus tenuissimus.  Among the three, vayal recorded the highest Simpson Diversity Index.  The highest Berger-Parker Dominance Index value in plantation indicates the presence of dominant species. Natural forests recorded highest Margalef Richness Index and the least was in vayal.  The highest Pielou’s Wiener Equitability Index in vayal indicated all species are evenly distributed.


 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Chandran, M.V., Gopakumar, S. and Mathews, A. 2020. Comparative phytosociological assessment of three terrestrial ecosystems of Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 12, 5 (Apr. 2020), 15631–15645. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.4754.12.5.15631-15645.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

M. Vishnu Chandran, Department of Natural Resource Management, College of Forestry, Kerala Agricultural University, N.H. 47, Vellanikkara, Thrissur, Kerala 680656, India.

Mr. M. Vishnu Chandran is a postgraduate in tropical forestry from the Department of Natural Resource Management of College of Forestry of Kerala Agricultural University, India and is specializing in the study and management of invasive alien plant species in tropical ecosystems. 

S. Gopakumar, Department of Natural Resource Management, College of Forestry, Kerala Agricultural University, N.H. 47, Vellanikkara, Thrissur, Kerala 680656, India.

Dr. S. Gopakumar is a Professor of Forest Management in the Department of Natural Resource Management of College of Forestry of Kerala Agricultural University, India with over 21 years of research and academic experience in tropical forestry

Anoopa Mathews, Department of Geology and Environmental Science, Christ College, Irinjalakuda, Thrissur, Kerala 680125, India.

Miss. Anoopa Mathews is an Environmental science postgraduate from Christ College Irinjalakkuda, India. She is an amateur plant taxonomist and an expert in tree and grass systematics.

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