Phytodiversity of chasmophytic habitats at Olichuchattam Waterfalls, Kerala, India

Main Article Content

Arun Christy
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9425-9934
Binu Thomas

Abstract

The present study was conducted to analyse the Phytodiversity of Chasmophytic habitats at Olichuchattam waterfalls, Kerala, India. The studies on the plants in such special type of habitats are very less. Hence the present study will help to know more about them. Field exploration and observations were made, plants were collected, identified and herbarium was prepared.  Analysis of plants and soil samples from different regions of the study area based on altitudinal variations was also done. As a result of the study, a total of 120 plant species that belonging to 49 families and 93 genera were documented. Of these 5 species are bryophyte, 10 species are pteridophytes and 105 species are angiosperms. The ornamental potentiality of the plants in the study area was also analysed and it shows that a total of 47 species have ornamental potentialities. The present study also highlighted some threatening factors can affect the distribution of plants in the present study area. The present study highlights that, the rocky cliffs and crevices serves as an excellent habitat for many interesting plant groups. The plants in these habitats are very unique and are attractive.The rocky cliffs and crevices represents a good indicator of rich biodiversity within small areas.


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Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Arun Christy and Thomas, B. 2020. Phytodiversity of chasmophytic habitats at Olichuchattam Waterfalls, Kerala, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 12, 9 (Jun. 2020), 16099–16109. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.4554.12.9.16099-16109.
Section
Communications
Author Biography

Binu Thomas, Department of Botany, Centre for PG studies & Research, St. Joseph’s College (Autonomus), Devagiri, Kozhikode, Kerala 673008, India.

Dr. Binu Thomas Asst. Professor
Department of Botany Centre for PG studies & Research  St. Joseph's College, Devagiri, Kozhikode, Kerala - 673008, India

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