Prevalence and morphotype diversity of Trichuris species and other soil-transmitted helminths in captive non-human primates in northern Nigeria

Main Article Content

Kamani Joshua
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1133-2281
James P. Yidawi
Aliyu Sada
Emmanuel G. Msheliza
Usman A. Turaki

Abstract

A study to determine the prevalence and morphotype diversity of soil-transmitted helminths in captive non-human primates (NHPs) in northern Nigeria was conducted.  Simple flotation and sedimentation methods were used to examine fecal samples. A Morphometric analysis was done on Trichuris spp. eggs to determine the diversity of whipworm circulating in NHPs in the study area.  High prevalence (60%) of infection was recorded in captive NHPs; Patas Monkey (n=17), Tantalus Monkey (n=9), Mona Monkey (n=7), Vervet Monkey (n=2), Mangabey Monkey (n=1), Baboon (n=14), and Chimpanzee (n=8) from parks and zoological gardens located in four Nigerian states (Borno, Gombe, Kano, and Plateau) and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Abuja. Captive NHPs examined were infected with helminths either as single, double or triple infections. Four zoonotic soil transmitted helminth (STH) genera, Trichuris, Strongyloides, Ancylostoma, and Enterobius were detected in the examined animals. Eggs of Trichuris spp. were the most prevalent with four morphotypes suggesting several morphotypes of whipworm were circulating among the NHPs in this region.  Further studies are required to elucidate the epidemiologic and public health implications of these findings.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Joshua, K., Yidawi, J.P., Sada, A., Msheliza, E.G. and Turaki, U.A. 2020. Prevalence and morphotype diversity of Trichuris species and other soil-transmitted helminths in captive non-human primates in northern Nigeria. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 12, 10 (Jul. 2020), 16239–16244. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.4552.12.10.16239-16244.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

Kamani Joshua, Parasitology Division, National Veterinary Research Institute, PMB 01 Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria.

Parasitology Division, National Veterinary Research Institute, PMB 01 Vom Plateau State Nigeria. Assistant Director

James P. Yidawi, Mohamet Lawan College of Agriculture, PMB 1427 Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.

Animal Health And production Technology Senior Lecturer

Aliyu Sada, Mohamet Lawan College of Agriculture, PMB 1427 Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.

Veterinary Extension Laboratory. Veterinary Investigation Officer

Emmanuel G. Msheliza, Parasitology Division, National Veterinary Research Institute, PMB 01 Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria.

Parasitology Division, National Veterinary Research Institute, PMB 01 Vom Plateau State Nigeria

Usman A. Turaki, Department of Animal Science Federal University Kashere, Gombe State, Nigeria.

Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri PMB 1069 Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria. Lecturer I

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