Roadkill of animals on the road passing from Kalaburagi to Chincholi, Karnataka, India

Main Article Content

Shankerappa Shantveerappa Hatti
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9976-379X
Heena Mubeen
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8008-1132

Abstract

The road passing from Kalaburagi to Chincholi in Karnataka, India, is around 70km and is a state highway having different types of moderately thick vegetation on either side. The animals utilizing this vegetation face huge threats from vehicular traffic, as was observed in recent years. Although this road does not have heavy traffic, there are significant numbers of roadkills. This study was conducted from February 2015 to January 2016. During the one-year period of the study, the mean frequency of heavy vehicles was 154 per day. Among the 283 roadkills recorded, 52 individuals belonged to the class Amphibia, constituting 18.37% of the total roadkills; no amphibian was killed in the summer season whereas 35 and 17 individuals were killed in the rainy season and in the winter season, respectively. Fifty-two individuals belonged to the class Reptilia, constituting 18.37% of the total roadkills; on an average, 10±5.8 individuals were killed in the summer season, 2.5±0.71 in the rainy season, and 3.5±2.12 in the winter season. Sixty-one individuals belonged to the class Aves, constituting 21.55% of the total roadkills; on an average, 5.71±3.03 individuals were killed in the summer season, 2.66±2.08 in the rainy season, and 4.33±3.51 in the winter season. One-hundred-and-eighteen individuals belonged to the class Mammalia, which was the most affected among the roadkills, constituting 41.69% of the total roadkills; on an average, 5.33±5.08 individuals were killed in the summer season, 5±3.9 in the rainy season, and 4.6±2.7 in the winter season. Under the IUCN Red List category, the majority of the species in this study are considered Least Concern and some of them are not even mentioned. The present study helps to know the problems and threats faced by wild animals and is the first work carried out in the region.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Hatti, S.S. and Mubeen, H. 2019. Roadkill of animals on the road passing from Kalaburagi to Chincholi, Karnataka, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 11, 7 (May 2019), 13868–13874. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.4292.11.7.13868-13874.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

Shankerappa Shantveerappa Hatti, Department of Studies and Research in Zoology, Gulbarga University, Rajapur Road, Kalaburagi, Karnataka 585106, India.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, GOVT. COLLEGE, KALABURAGI

Heena Mubeen, Department of Studies and Research in Zoology, Gulbarga University, Rajapur Road, Kalaburagi, Karnataka 585106, India.

Senior Research Fellow

 DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, GOVT. COLLEGE, KALABURAGI

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