Odonate diversity of Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary - a Ramsar site in Gujarat, India

Main Article Content

Darshana M. Rathod
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7505-8408
B. M. Parasharya
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1541-2150

Abstract

Odonate diversity of Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary, a Ramsar site in Gujarat, was studied between January 2015 and July 2017.  A total of 46 species belonging to two suborders, six families, and 27 genera were recorded, which included 14 species of Zygoptera (damselfly) and 32 species of Anisoptera (dragonfly).  Out of the 46 species, 40 species are new records for the Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary.  The record of Enallagma cyathigerum Charpentier, 1840 in Gujarat needs verification.  Need to monitor changes taking place in Odonata species composition after influx from Narmada canal at Nalsarovar is emphasized.

 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Rathod, D.M. and Parasharya, B.M. 2018. Odonate diversity of Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary - a Ramsar site in Gujarat, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 10, 8 (Jul. 2018), 12117–12122. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.4017.10.8.12117-12122.
Section
Short Communications

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