Foliicolous fungi on medicinal plants in Thiruvananthapuram District, Kerala, India

Main Article Content

A. Sabeena
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3596-7997
V. B. Hosagoudar
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3596-7997
V. Divaharan
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9858-9938

Abstract

Thiruvananthapuram District harbours more than 1,000 medicinal plants of which 241 plants are hosts to foliicolous fungi belonging to 76 families and 187 genera.  These medicinal plants have been arranged alphabetically, along with the fungi they host.  This work has resulted in recording 253 fungal taxa, belonging to 44 genera of Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Fungi Imperfecti.

 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Sabeena, A., Hosagoudar, V.B. and Divaharan, V. 2018. Foliicolous fungi on medicinal plants in Thiruvananthapuram District, Kerala, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 10, 3 (Mar. 2018), 11470–11479. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3761.10.3.11470-11479.
Section
Short Communications

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