Observations of occurrence and daily activity patterns of ungulates in the Endau Rompin Landscape, peninsular Malaysia

Main Article Content

Win Sim Tan
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7859-9197
Norazmi bin Amir Hamzah
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8441-7916
Salman Saaban
Nurul Aida Zawakhir
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8461-9809
Yugees Rao
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2357-6112
Norolhuda Jamaluddin
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0845-9468
Francis Cheong
Norhidayati binti Khalid
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9207-9582
Nur Iadiah Mohd Saat
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0497-5206
Eka Nadia binti Zaidee Ee
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2269-4069
Azwan bin Hamdan
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9111-8802
Mei Mei Chow
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4487-5012
Chee Pheng Low
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3721-9180
Mufeng Voon
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0568-1186
Song Horng Liang
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3813-2247
Martin Tyson
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3440-2898
Melvin Terry Gumal
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7872-5907

Abstract

Camera trap data was used to study occurrence and daily activity patterns in the Endau Rompin Landscape of peninsular Malaysia during 2011, 2013 and 2015 to estimate Malayan Tiger Panthera tigris jacksoni population densities.  By-catch data were also collected for seven ungulate species: Barking Deer Muntiacus muntjak, Bearded Pig Sus barbatus, Wild Boar Sus scrofa, Greater Mousedeer Tragulus napu, Lesser Mousedeer Tragulus kanchil, Malayan Tapir Tapirus indicus and Sambar Deer Rusa unicolor.  Of these, Bayesian single-season occupancy analysis suggested that Barking Deer were the most widespread and Mousedeer spp. the least widespread during the study period.  Bearded Pig, Malayan Tapir and Wild Boar were recorded in more than half of the camera trap area (Sambar Deer was excluded due to small sample size).  Daily activity patterns based on independent captures in 2015 suggest that Barking Deer, Bearded Pig and Wild Boar are mostly diurnal, mousedeer species are crepuscular and Malayan Tapir strongly nocturnal. 

 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Tan, W.S., bin Amir Hamzah, N., Saaban, S., Zawakhir, N.A., Rao, Y., Jamaluddin, N., Cheong, F., binti Khalid, N., Mohd Saat, N.I., binti Zaidee Ee, E.N., bin Hamdan, A., Chow, M.M., Low, C.P., Voon, M., Liang, S.H., Tyson, M. and Gumal, M.T. 2018. Observations of occurrence and daily activity patterns of ungulates in the Endau Rompin Landscape, peninsular Malaysia. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 10, 2 (Feb. 2018), 11245–11253. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3519.10.2.11245-11253.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

Win Sim Tan, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Win Sim Tan is a senior researcher for WCS - Malaysia Program. He has an honours degree in Wildlife Ecology from University of Wisconsin – Madison. He has been involved in a tiger conservation project in the Endau Rompin landscape of Johor and Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia since 2013.

Norazmi bin Amir Hamzah, Johor National Parks Corporation, Aras 1, Bangunan Dato' Mohamad Saleh Perang, Kota Iskandar, 79576 Iskandar Puteri, Johor, Malaysia.

Norazmi bin Amir Hamzah is currently the director of Johor National Parks Corporation.

Salman Saaban, Department of Wildlife and National Parks of Peninsular Malaysia, Km 10, Jalan Cheras, 56100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Salman Saaban is currently the director of Enforcement Division for the Department of Wildlife and National Parks of Peninsular Malaysia.

Nurul Aida Zawakhir, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Nurul Aida completed a degree in Ecology and Biodiversity at University of Malaya, Malaysia. She is now an Assistant Coordinator managing the Pahang Endau-Rompin Landscape tiger team. She was previously involved in the wildlife monitoring surveys including camera trapping of tigers for population estimation.

Yugees Rao, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Yugees Anandarao is currently one of the three Assistant Coordinators working on a tiger conservation project in the Endau Rompin landscape of Johor and Pahang, Malaysia. She has been working for WCS - Malaysia since 2012

Norolhuda Jamaluddin, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Norolhuda Jamaluddin has a degree in Biology from University of Technology Mara, Malaysia. She has been working with WCS - Malaysia in a tiger project which focusing on research and law enforcement to save the precious animal and its environment since 2010.

Francis Cheong, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Francis Cheongis currently the assistant director for WCS – Malaysia Program, managing the tiger and elephant conservation project in the Endau Rompin landscape of Johor and Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia.

Norhidayati binti Khalid, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Norhidayati binti Khalid is currently one of the senior researchers for WCS – Malaysia Program, working on an elephant conservation project in the Endau Rompin landscape of Johor and Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia.

Nur Iadiah Mohd Saat, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Nur Iadiah completed her degree in Conservation and Management of Biodiversity in 2010. She joined WCS Malaysia as an intern and subsequently a researcher to work on a human-elephant conflict and mitigation project in 2012. She is currently a senior researcher, working on a tiger conservation project in the Endau Rompin landscape of Johor and Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia.

Eka Nadia binti Zaidee Ee, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Eka Nadia has a degree in Zoology from the faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. She worked on a turtle conservation project for WWF-Malaysia for 6 months before joining WCS - Malaysia as a tiger researcher project in the Endau Rompin landscape. She is familiar with camera trapping to estimate tiger population and monitor tiger hotspots.

Azwan bin Hamdan, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Azwan Hamdan is a senior researcher at WCS – Malaysia Program, involved in camera trapping, wildlife surveys, threat monitoring and human-wildlife conflict data collection. He is an administrator for SMART (Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tools) database for a tiger research project in the Endau Rompin Landscape of Johor and Pahang, Malaysia.

Mei Mei Chow, Penang Green Council, Tingkat 46, KOMTAR, 10503 Penang, Malaysia.

Mei Mei Chow is an environmental research assistant at Penang Green Council based in Penang, Malaysia. She was previously a wildlife researcher for WCS-Malaysia Program, involved in wildlife surveys and patrol data management.

Chee Pheng Low, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Low Chee Pheng is the project coordinator of the tiger program for Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program. She coordinates the research program to monitor the tiger and prey population in the Endau-Rompin Landscape in Malaysia.

Mufeng Voon, Sarawak Forestry Corporation, Lot 218, Jalan Tapang, Kota Sentosa, 93250 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Voon Mufeng was with the Wildlife Conservation Society as a senior researcher for four years handling the tiger conservation projects in Rompin, Pahang. Currently she works with the Sarawak Forestry Corporation (SFC) as an Executive in the GeoDrone Unit, managing the geospatial information for five main core functions of SFC. She holds a MSc in Conservation Biology from University of Kent, United Kingdom.

Song Horng Liang, Pertubuhan Pelingdung Alam Malaysia, B-06-06 Blok Casa Green Condominium, Jalan Casa Green, 43200 Cheras, Selangor, Malaysia.

Song Horng Liang has been working in wildlife conservation for 15 years; and is currently the executive director of a local Malaysian NGO, Pelindung Alam Malaysia, working on large scale wildlife surveys that cover from elephants, tigers to gibbons and hornbills. He previously managed the elephant and tiger units of Wildlife Conservation Society Malaysia for about 8 years; worked for TRAFFIC Southeast Asia on undercover wildlife trade investigation on Saiga antelopes, tigers and their prey in Malaysia and Singapore for 2 years; and assisted the Rainforest Wolf Project of Raincoast Conservation Foundation in western Canada for 2 years. He received degrees from University of Victoria, Canada (Bachelor) and National University of Singapore (MSc).

Martin Tyson, Wildlife Conservation Society, 132 Bloomingdale Ave #2, Saranac Lake, NY 12983, United States of America.

Martin Tyson is currently a technical advisor for Asian elephants at the Wildlife Conservation Society. He has worked in several SE Asian countries, focusing on elephant population survey, mitigation of human–elephant conflict, and assisting range states in developing elephant conservation plans.

Melvin Terry Gumal, Wildlife Conservation Society - Malaysia Program, 7 Jalan Ridgeway, 93200 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Melvin Gumal is the Country Director for Wildlife Conservation Society Malaysia.  He has been in conservation science since 1988 and studied in the universities of Melbourne and Cambridge. He currently works with colleagues on conservation of tigers and their prey, elephants, orang-utans, sharks, rays and their habitats.

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