An observation on the Odonata fauna of the Asansol-Durgapur Industrial Area, Burdwan, West Bengal, India

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Amar Kumar Nayak
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7227-8592
Utpal Singha Roy
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8683-1056

Abstract

The present investigation was undertaken as a pilot study to examine the diversity, occurrence and distribution pattern of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) from the selected study sites of the Asansol-Durgapur industrial area of Burdwan District of West Bengal, India from January 2012 to December 2015.  A combination of direct search and opportunistic sighting methods were applied to record 57 different Odonata species (38 dragonflies and 19 damselflies).  Among the dragonflies the most diverse family was Libellulidae represented by 36 species while among damselflies Coenagrionidae was the most diverse family represented by 16 species.  In spite of the Asansol-Durgapur region being an industrial urban area, the present study revealed a handsome diversity of odonates.  A suitable geographic location, favourable climatic conditions, heterogeneous habitat types that included ponds, wetlands, riverbeds, grasslands and agricultural lands along with the presence of appropriate vegetation provided a comfortable shelter for Odonata species to flourish in this ecoregion.   All the odonates noted in the present study belong to the Least Concerned category as designated by IUCN.

 

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How to Cite
[1]
Nayak, A.K. and Roy, U.S. 2016. An observation on the Odonata fauna of the Asansol-Durgapur Industrial Area, Burdwan, West Bengal, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 8, 2 (Feb. 2016), 8503–8517. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2572.8.2.8503-8517.
Section
Short Communications

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