Report of the early winter migrants and resident birds in an inland wetland near Tundi Camp, Bajana, Gujarat

Main Article Content

Abhishek Chatterjee
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4837-4787
Sudeshna Ghoshal
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0131-7048
Soumyajit Chowdhury
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0940-9809
Pinakiranjan Chakrabarti
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3836-6019

Abstract

The study is based on the avian community observed in the region.  In total, 1,079 individuals, 62 genera and 79 species of birds belonging to 35 families have been recorded.  Among them, the family Anatidae with 20.42% incidence is the most frequent; immediately followed by the family Phoenicopteridae (10.59% of occurrence).  Little Cormorant Phalacrocorax niger is the most abundant avian species observed.  The community consists of 44% resident; 36% resident-migrant and 20% migrant bird species.  It was observed that the concerned community shows a considerable diversity and a correspondingly low value of dominance.  In the feeding guild analysis, the insectivore guild has the most number of recorded avian species.  The feeding guild affiliations also point out that the overall community is fairly rich in its composition as it houses bird species belonging to various feeding guilds.

 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Chatterjee, A., Ghoshal, S., Chowdhury, S. and Chakrabarti, P. 2018. Report of the early winter migrants and resident birds in an inland wetland near Tundi Camp, Bajana, Gujarat. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 10, 5 (Apr. 2018), 11652–11658. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2459.10.5.11652-11658.
Section
Short Communications
Author Biographies

Abhishek Chatterjee, Department of Zoology, Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College, University of Calcutta

Student, 

Department of Zoology,

Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College

 

Sudeshna Ghoshal, Department of Zoology, Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College University of Calcutta

Associate Professor,

Department of Zoology

Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College

University of Calcutta

Soumyajit Chowdhury, Department of Zoology, Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College University of Calcutta

Lecturer,

Department of Zoology

Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College

University of Calcutta

Pinakiranjan Chakrabarti, Department of Zoology, Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College University of Calcutta

Associate Professor and Head,

Department of Zoology

Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College

University of Calcutta 

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