Population status and species diversity of wetland birds in the Rapti and Narayani rivers and associated wetlands of Chitwan National Park, Nepal

Main Article Content

Bed Bahadur Khadka
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6382-8425
Paras Mani Acharya
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4077-9568
Sunil Lal Rajbhandari
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5728-3599

Abstract

 In autumn and winter, 24 migratory waterfowl species from the north utilise the wetlands of Chitwan National Park, which provide vital staging, roosting, resting, foraging and breeding places. The birds stay for about eight months before returning north in March and April. These birds are indicators of healthy wetlands, and they distribute nutrients through their droppings that increase primary production of aquatic vegetation and fish. A population census of wetland birds was conducted during January 2014 in Chitwan National Park on the Rapti and Narayani rivers and associated wetlands, including Lami Tal, Tamor Tal, Garud Tal, Devi Tal and marshes and lakes around Temple Tiger. The study found that the Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea was the migratory waterfowl with the largest population in these rivers.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Khadka, B.B., Acharya, P.M. and Rajbhandari, S.L. 2017. Population status and species diversity of wetland birds in the Rapti and Narayani rivers and associated wetlands of Chitwan National Park, Nepal. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 9, 6 (Jun. 2017), 10297–10306. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2364.9.6.10297-10306.
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Bed Bahadur Khadka, Chitwan National Park, Headquarters, Kasara, Chitwan, Nepal

Bed Bahadur Khadka is Assistant Conservation Officer, head of Gharial Conservation and Breeding Center, Chitwan National Park. He has wide experiences in wetland, waterbirds, mugger/ gharial conservation in river systems of Nepal. 

Paras Mani Acharya, Tribhuvan University,P.O. Box. 8212, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal

Paras Mani Acharya is Professor of Zoology in Tribhuvan University, Nepal and involved in wetlands/ Smooth-coated otter and other aquatic life conservation in the river systems of Chitwan and Bardia National Park. 

Sunil Lal Rajbhandari, Tribhuvan University,P.O. Box. 8212, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal

 Sunil LalRajbhandari is Professor of Zoology in Tribhuvan University, Nepal and involved in gharial and aquatic life conservation in the river systems of Chitwan National Park.

 

References

Acharya, P.M. (2002). The status of wetland environment and threat analysis. A report to UNDP-GEF Conservation and sustainable use of wetlands in Nepal, IUCN Nepal, 114 pp.

Acharya, P.M. & S.L. Rajbhandari (2012). Investigation of population status and habitats of Lutrogale perspicillata in Narayani River, Chitwan National Park. A final research report to Rufford Foundation U.K., 50pp.

Baral, H.S. & C. Inskipp (2004). The State of Nepal’s Birds 2004, Kathmandu. Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation, Bird Conservation and IUCN Nepal.

Bhandari, B. (1998). An inventory of Nepal’s Wetlands. Final report, Kathmandu, Nepal: IUCN Nepal, 329pp.

BCN & DNPWC (in prep). Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas in Nepal.Kathmandu: Bird Conservation Nepal and Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation.

BES (2013). Chitwan Bird Check List. Bird Education Society, Chitwan, Nepal, 44 pp.

CNP ( 2013). Chitwan National Park Monthly records - 2013. Chitwan National Park.

CNP (2014). Chitwan National Park Monthly Records - 2014. Chitwan National Park.

CNP ( 2015). Status of Wetlands and Mugger Crocodiles in and Around Chitwan National Park. Chitwan National Park, 152pp.

Dahal. B.R. (2007). Effects of Water-Hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes on aquatic birds at Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve. Danphe 16(1): 64–65.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, T. Inskipp & H.S. Baral (2016). Birds of Nepal. A Field Guide. Fully Revised Edition. Christopher Helm, London, 386pp.

IUCN (2004). A Review of the Status and Threats to Wetlands of Nepal. IUCN Nepal, Kathmandu, 80pp.

Khadka, B.B. (2005). Midwinter count of waterbirds at Chitwan National Park. Danphe 14(3/4): 3–5.

Khadka, B. B. (2006). Bird survey along the Rapti and Narayani Rivers of Chitwan National Park. Unpublished.

Khadka, B.B. (2010).Midwinter waterbirds counts at Chitwan National Park, Danphe 19(2/3): 3–8.

Khadka, B.B. (2011). Midwinter waterbirds counts at Chitwan National Park, Danphe 21(1): 1–5.

Khadka, B.B. (2012). Midwinter waterbirds counts at Chitwan National Park . Danphe 21(1): 3–5.

Khadka, B.B. (2013). Midwinter waterbirdscount in 2012 at Chitwan National Park. Danphe 22(2/3): 3–7.

Khadka, B.B. (2014). Bird survey along the Rapti and Narayani Rivers of Chitwan National Park. Unpublished.

Odum, E.P. (1971). Fundamentals of Ecology. 3rd Edition. W.B. Saunders Company, 574pp.

Rajbhandari, S.L. & P.M. Acharya (2015). Study of investigation of population, habitat and hatching success of Gavialis gangeticus in Narayani River of Chitwan National Park. A Final Research Report submitted to Rufford Foundation, U.K., 38pp.

Shah, J.P. (1997). Koshi Tappu Wetlands: Nepal’s Ramsar Site. IUCN, Bangkok, Thailand, 253pp.

Thapa, I. (2006).Wetland Avifauna of Ponds of Kathmandu Valley: World Wetlands Day, Celebration Report, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Urfi, A.J., M. Sen, A. Kalam & J. Megnathan (2005). Countingbirds in India: methodologies and trends. Current Science 89(12): 1997–2003.

WBC (2006). Conservation and Sustainable Use of Beeshazar Lake System: A Five-year Action Plan. Report to The Netherland’s committee for IUCN small grant for wetland programme (SWP-IUCN), The Netherlands.

Wei, L.Z. & T. Mundkur (2004). Numbers and distribution of waterbirds and wetlands in the Asia-Pacific region. Results of the Asian Waterbird Census: 1997–2001. Wetlands International, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Yadav, U.K,, P.K. Jha, D.B. Zobel & M.J. Behan (1987). A Practical Manual Ecology. Ratna Book Distributors, 149pp.