Habitat preference and roosting behaviour of the Red Junglefowl Gallus gallus (Aves: Galliformes: Phasianidae) in Deva Vatala National Park, Azad Jammu & Kashmir, Pakistan

Main Article Content

Faraz Akrim
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9313-0637
Tariq Mahmood
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2432-7732
Muhammad Siddique Awan
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2506-0742
Siddiqa Qasim Butt
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2122-0646
Durr-e-Shawar .
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4116-0329
Muhammad Arslan Asadi
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2609-0193
Imad-ul-din Zangi
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0553-045X

Abstract

In Pakistan the Red Junglefowl is reported only from Deva Vatala National Park.  The present study investigated the habitat preference and roosting behavior of the Red Junglefowl in three different habitat types which included a wild area, cultivated lands and a human settlement area.  Habitat preference during the summer season comprised 87.50% wild area, 2.5% cultivated area and 10% human settlement area; during the winter season, the preference was 90% wild area and 10% human settlement area.  More numbers of female birds (22) were seen during both the seasons as compared to males (17).  The birds preferred old trees for roosting.  A total of 16 roost sites were explored on five different tree species; including Acacia nilotica (25%), Acacia modesta (12.5%), Olea ferruginea (18.75%), Magnifera indica (25%) and Dalbergia sissoo (18.75%).  The species roosted in groups of 4-8 birds and the duration of the average roosting time was about eight and half hours.  We propose that similar studies on the ecology of Red Junglefowl should be conducted to get a better understanding of the species in the study area which is perquisite for its conservation.

 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Akrim, F., Mahmood, T., Awan, M.S., Butt, S.Q., ., D.- e-S., Asadi, M.A. and Zangi, I.- ul- din 2016. Habitat preference and roosting behaviour of the Red Junglefowl Gallus gallus (Aves: Galliformes: Phasianidae) in Deva Vatala National Park, Azad Jammu & Kashmir, Pakistan. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 8, 9 (Aug. 2016), 9138–9143. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2256.8.9.9138-9143.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

Faraz Akrim, Department of Wildlife Management PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan

Faraz Akrim is PhD scholar in department of Wildlife Management, Pir Mehr Ali Shah Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan (PMAS AAUR) working on mammals and birds

 

Tariq Mahmood, Department of Wildlife Management PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan

Tariq Mahmood is Assistant Professor in department of Wildlife Management PMAS AAUR working on mammals, birds and amphibians. 

 

Muhammad Siddique Awan, Department of Zoology, University of Azad Jammu & Kashmir, Muzaffarabad, Pakistan

Muhammad Siddique Awan is Assistant Professor in department of Zoology, University of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan working on mammals, birds and reptiles.

 

Siddiqa Qasim Butt, Department of Wildlife Management PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan

Siddiqa Qasim Butt is wildlife researcher working on birds and reptiles. 

 

Durr-e-Shawar ., Department of Wildlife Management PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan

Durr-E-Shawar is Assistant Professor in department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Haripur working on mammals and birds.

 

Muhammad Arslan Asadi, Department of Wildlife Management PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan

Muhammad Arslan Asadi is Wildlife Biologist at Barari Forest Management, ABU DHABI and his area of specialization is birds and reptiles.

 

Imad-ul-din Zangi, Department of Wildlife Management PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan

Imad-Ul-Din-Zangi is M.Phil. Scholar in department of Wildlife Management PMAS AAUR working on birds.

 

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