Flora of Fergusson College campus, Pune, India: monitoring changes over half a century

Main Article Content

Ashish N. Nerlekar
Sairandhri A. Lapalikar
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0022-0586
Akshay A. Onkar
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6217-4669
S. L. Laware
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7987-8198
M. C. Mahajan
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9432-0379

Abstract

The present study was aimed at determining the vascular plant species richness of an urban green-space- the Fergusson College campus, Pune and comparing it with the results of the past flora which was documented in 1958 by Dr. V.D. Vartak. For this, the species richness data was obtained by both secondary sources and intensive surveys from 2009–2014. The data from the primary and secondary sources resulted in the documentation of 812 species belonging to 542 genera under 124 families, of which 534 species (65.8%) exists  today as compared to 654 in 1958 (net loss of 120 species). Of the 812 species listed, 278 species were observed only during the past, 210 species were exclusively recorded in the current survey and 324 species were observed both, in the past as well as current survey. Arboreal species richness recorded till date (196) in the campus accounts for 40.7% of that of the entire Pune City. Leguminosae and Poaceae were the dominant dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous families respectively and an inventory of all the species recorded is provided. Although the botanical garden over the past years has lost 187 species, it still houses rare species such as Acacia greggii, which has been reported from Maharashtra for the first time. Considering the rapidly changing urban land use in the city, much attention should be paid towards the conservation of these green spaces, for which such studies provide baseline data.

 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Nerlekar, A.N., Lapalikar, S.A., Onkar, A.A., Laware, S.L. and Mahajan, M.C. 2016. Flora of Fergusson College campus, Pune, India: monitoring changes over half a century. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 8, 2 (Feb. 2016), 8452–8487. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.1950.8.2.8452-8487.
Section
Data Papers
Author Biographies

Ashish N. Nerlekar, Department of Botany, Fergusson College, Pune, Maharashtra 411004, India Current address: Department of Biodiversity, M.E.S. Abasaheb Garware College, Pune, Maharashtra 411004, India

Ashish Nerlekar is interested in urban biodiversity, plant taxonomy, ecology and is currently working on the ecology of a threatened plant Jatropha nana.

 

Sairandhri A. Lapalikar, Department of Botany, Fergusson College, Pune, Maharashtra 411004, India Current address: Department of Biodiversity, M.E.S. Abasaheb Garware College, Pune, Maharashtra 411004, India

Sairandhri Lapalikar is pursuing studies focusing on plant community ecology and is currently working on the characterization of microhabitats of the rock-outcrops around Lonavala, Maharashtra.

 

Akshay A. Onkar, Department of Botany, Fergusson College, Pune, Maharashtra 411004, India

Akshay Onkar studies the ethnobotany and flora of eastern Maharashtra and is also interested is socio-political aspects of conservation and biodiversity.

 

S. L. Laware, Department of Botany, Fergusson College, Pune, Maharashtra 411004, India

Shankar Laware incorporates interdisciplinary approach in research, and has come up with  several novel applications

 

M. C. Mahajan, Department of Botany, Fergusson College, Pune, Maharashtra 411004, India

Minakshi Mahajan is interested in angiosperm taxonomy and has worked on extensive documentation of the arboreal flora of Fergusson College campus. 

 

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