Coprological study of gastrointestinal parasites of captive animals at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh

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M.M. Khatun
N. Begum
M.A.A. Mamun
M.M.H. Mondal
M.S.U. Azam

Abstract

A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in different groups of mammals housed at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh. A total of 45 fecal samples of different animals (11 carnivores, 26 herbivores and 8 primates) were examined from April to September 2011 for the presence of gastrointestinal parasites. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 60% (27/45) of which 35.6% (16/45) were helminth infections and 24% (11/45) were protozoic infections. The identified parasites included protozoa (Balantidium coli and Coccidia sp.), nematodes (Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara cati, Strongyloides sp., Dictyocaulus sp., Trichuris sp. and stomach worm), cestodes (Spirometra sp. and Moniezia benedeni) and trematodes (Fasciola sp.). At least one parasite was identified in the fecal samples of all animals except of the samples from bear, python, water buck and olive baboon. Mixed infections were observed in Rhesus monkey (Trichuris sp. and Balantidium coli), in deer (Strongyloides sp. and Coccidia sp.) and in lion (Toxascaris leonina and Spirometra sp.). Helminth infections were more common than protozoic infections in carnivores and herbivores, whereas in primates, protozoic infections were more common than helminth infections. The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites found in zoo animals in this study emphasizes the importance of controlling these parasitic infections in order to safeguard the health of housed wild animals and of the humans working with these animals.

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[1]
Khatun, M., Begum, N., Mamun, M., Mondal, M. and Azam, M. 2014. Coprological study of gastrointestinal parasites of captive animals at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 6, 8 (Jul. 2014), 6142–6147. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o3093.6142-7.
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