Elephant Elephas maximus Linnaeus (Proboscidea: Elephantidae) migration paths in the Nilgiri Hills, India in the late 1970s

Main Article Content

E.R.C. Davidar
P. Davidar
P. Davidar
J.P. Puyravaud

Abstract

The study presented was carried out in 1978 with the support of the Asian Elephant Specialist Group (AsESG) of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Survival Commission (SSC). Its objective was to investigate the impediments to elephant movement in the Nilgiri Hills, in the Western Ghats of India, in an attempt to suggest positive steps to encourage movement through the provision of corridors. The report was left unpublished, but given its importance as a reference document for the conservation of the Asian elephant in the Nilgiris, in 2011 the last two authors decided to publish it. The process of habitat fragmentation has been going on ever since man started agriculture. But this problem has, of late, become much more acute due to mounting pressure on land. The corridor concept applied to wildlife is the provision of a free and, as far as possible, unimpeded way for the passage of wild animals between two wildlife zones. A corridor’s more important function is to prevent wild animals from getting isolated in small pocket-like islands. Maintaining elephant habitat connectivity in and around the Nilgiris rests upon the understanding that elephant populations of the several protected areas of the now Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve must remain active. The first author surveyed the Nilgiris on foot and on elephant back for several months in 1978. It was concluded that four areas (the Nilgiri north slopes and Deccan Plateau, the south and southeastern slopes, the Gudalur Plateau, and the upper plateau) harboured together 10 corridors that needed to be maintained, or restored, or even partially restored.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Davidar, E., Davidar, P., Davidar, P. and Puyravaud, J. 2012. Elephant Elephas maximus Linnaeus (Proboscidea: Elephantidae) migration paths in the Nilgiri Hills, India in the late 1970s. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 4, 14 (Nov. 2012), 3284–3293. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o3008.3284-93.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

E.R.C. Davidar

The late E.R.C. Davidar was a lawyer by profession and a conservationist. He pioneered studies on the Nilgiri tahr, elephant corridors, the dhole and the striped hyena. He established what may be the first ever private reserve in India and has authored a book on the recent ecological history of the Nilgiris.

P. Davidar

Peter Davidar holds a MPhil in Wildlife Biology. He has undertaken surveys on elephant corridors and is presently a trustee of the Sigur Nature Trust, a private wildlife corridor. He is interested in wildlife photography.

P. Davidar

Priya Davidar is a professor of ecology at the Pondicherry University. She teaches conservation biology and behavior. Her research interests span over the fields of biogeography, biodiversity, pollination ecology and conservation.

J.P. Puyravaud

Jean-Philippe Puyravaud is an ecologist associated with ECOS, a trust for the conservation of nature. His main interest is habitat management for endangered species. He advises MSc and PhD students of the Pondicherry University in research methodology and landscape ecology.