Diversity and seasonality of polypore fungi in the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India

Main Article Content

A. Muhammed Iqbal
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1143-2584
Kattany Vidyasagaran
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0663-3477
P. Narayan Ganesh
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3641-573X

Abstract

The objective of present study was to understand the diversity, distribution and seasonality of polypore fungi in the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary in three different seasons.  Results obtained showed that density and frequency of occurrence have been varied significantly during different seasons and the community structure and species composition during monsoon and post monsoon seasons were distinct from pre-monsoon season.  Fomitopsis feei with higher abundance values dominated the moist deciduous forests during monsoon season (17.72) and post-monsoon season (13.79).  During pre-monsoon season, Daedalea flavida was the dominant species with abundance value of 10.93.  The above fungi were predominant during all the seasons due to their high ecological amplitude.  Fungal diversity analysis showed that species richness was higher during monsoon season and revealed the influence of seasonal variation on fungal diversity.  The high species similarity was observed between monsoon and post monsoon season compared to pre-monsoon and monsoon.

 

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Iqbal, A.M., Vidyasagaran, K. and Ganesh, P.N. 2016. Diversity and seasonality of polypore fungi in the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 8, 12 (Oct. 2016), 9434–9442. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2567.8.12.9434-9442.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

A. Muhammed Iqbal, College of Forestry Kerala Agricultural University Vellanikkara Thrissur 680 656 Kerala

Research Scholar Department Of FOrest Management and Utilization

Kattany Vidyasagaran, College of Forestry Kerala Agricultural University Vellanikkara Thrissur 680 656 Kerala

Dean

College of Forestry Kerala Agricultural University
Vellanikkara Thrissur 680 656 Kerala

P. Narayan Ganesh, Sree Krishna College, Calicut University, Choondal Mattom Rd, Koonammoochi, Alur, Guruvayur, Thrissur, Kerala 680602, India

Associate Professor

Department of Botany

Sree Krishna College, Calicut University, Choondal Mattom Rd, Koonammoochi, Alur, Guruvayur, Thrissur, Kerala 680602, India

References

Andrew, E.E., T.R. Kinge, E.M. Tabil, N. Thiobal & A.M. Mih (2013). Diversity and distribution of macrofungi (mushrooms) in the Mount Cameroon Region. Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment 5(10): 318–334; http://dx.doi.org/ 10.5897/JENE2013.0379

Bakshi, B.K. (1971). Indian Polyporaceae (On Trees and Timber). ICAR, New Delhi, 246p.

Champion, S.H.G. & S.K. Seth (1986). A Review of The Forest Types of India, Government of India, New Delhi, xxvii+404pp.

Cooke, C.R. & A. D.M. Rayner (1984). Ecology of Saprotrophic Fungi. Longman, London, 414p.

Curtis, J.T. & R.P. McIntosh (1950). The interrelations of certain analytical and synthetic phytosociological characters. Ecology 31: 434–455.

Hawker L. E. (1965). Environmental influence on reproduction, pp. 436-465. In: Ainsworth, G.C. & A.S. Sussman (eds.). The Fungi - An Advanced Treatise - Vol. II. Academic press. London.

Ingold C. T. (1965). Spore release, pp. 679–707. In: Ainsworth, G.C. & A.S. Sussman (eds.). The Fungi- an advanced treatise. Vol. II. Academic press. London.

Karim, M., M.R. Kavosi & G. Hajizadeh (2013). Macrofungal Communities in Hyrcanian Forests, North of Iran: Relationships with Season and Forest Types. Ecologia Balkanica 5(1): 87–96.

Leelavathy, K.M. & P.N. Ganesh (2000). Polypores of Kerala. Daya Publishing House, Delhi, 165pp.

Lodge, D.J., J.F. Ammiranti, T.E. O’dell & G.M. Mueller (2004). Collecting and Describing Macrofungi, pp. 128–158. In: Mueller, G.M., G.F. Bills & M.S. Foster (eds.). Biodiversity of Fungi: Inventory and Monitoring Methods. Elsevier Academic Press, USA,

Mehus, H. (1986). Fruit body production of macrofungi in some North Norwegian forest types. Nordic Journal of Botany 6(5): 679–702.

Mohanan, C. (2011). Macrofungi of Kerala. KFRI Handbook No. 27. Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi, Kerala, India, 597pp.

Nogueira-Melo, P.J.S. & T.B. Gibertoni (2014). The community

structure of macroscopic basidiomycetes (Fungi) in Brazilian mangroves influenced by temporal and spatial variations. Revista de Biologia Tropical 62(4): 1587–1595.

Park, D. (1968). The ecology of terrestrial fungi, pp. 5–39. In: Ainsworth, G.C. & A.S. Sussman (eds.). The Fungi - An Advanced Treatise. Vol. III. Academic press. London.

Pradhan, P., A.K. Duttaa, A. Roy, S.K. Basu & K. Acharyaa (2013). Macrofungal diversity and habitat specificity: a case study. Biodiversity 14(3): 147–161; http://dx.doi.org/

1080/14888386.2013.805660

Shannon, C.E. & W. Weiner (1963). The Mathematical theory of Communication. University of Illinois Press, Urbana, U.S.A. 117pp.

Simpson, E.H. (1949). Measurement of diversity. Nature 163: 688.

Sharma, J.R. (2006). Wood rotting fungi of Temperate Himalaya, pp. 101‒120. In: Mukerji, K.G. & C. Manoharachary (eds.). Current Concepts in Botany. IK International Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

Sorenson, T. (1948). A method of establishing groups of equal amplitude in plant sociology based on similarity of species content and its application to analyses of the vegetation on Danish commons. Biologiske Skrifter 5: 1-34.

Toljander, Y.K., B.D. Lindahl, L. Holmer & N.O.S. Högberg (2006). Environmental fluctuations facilitate species co-existence and increase decomposition in communities of wood decay fungi. Oecologia 148: 625–631; http://dx.doi.org/ 0.1007/s00442-006-0406-3

Yamashita, S., T. Hattori & H. Abe (2010). Host preference and species richness of wood inhabiting aphyllophoraceous fungi in a cool temperate area of Japan. Mycologia 102: 11–19; http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/09-008