Diversity of two families Libellulidae and Coenagrionidae (Odonata) in Regional Institute of Education Campus, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

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Priyamvada Pandey
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2684-5883
Animesh Kumar Mohapatra
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6094-9638

Abstract

Libellulidae and Coenagrionidae are the most dominant families among dragonflies and damselflies.  The present study deals with the diversity, occurrence and present status of libellulids and coenagrionids within the Regional Institute of Education Campus in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India (RIEC). The major objectives of this study are to prepare a preliminary checklist of libellulids and coenagrionids species in the RIEC and to find out the status and distribution of genera and species in their respective families.  This study is also aimed at systematic planning for developing different strategies for conservation of odonates in the campus.  During this study a total of 24 species have been recorded out of which 20 species belong to the family Libellulidae representing 15 genera and four species belong to the family Coenagrionidae representing four genera.  The findings of this study are based on the survey which was carried out for a period of four months in 2015.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Pandey, P. and Mohapatra, A.K. 2017. Diversity of two families Libellulidae and Coenagrionidae (Odonata) in Regional Institute of Education Campus, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 9, 2 (Feb. 2017), 9851–9857. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2547.9.2.9851-9857.
Section
Short Communications
Author Biographies

Priyamvada Pandey, Regional Institute of Education (NCERT) Bhubaneswar - 751022, Odisha, India

M.Sc. Lifescience.Ed

Department of Life Science Education

Regional Institute of Education (NCERT)

Animesh Kumar Mohapatra, Regional Institute of Education (NCERT) Bhubaneswar - 751022, Odisha, India

Professor in Zoology

Department of Life Science Education

Regional Institute of Education (NCERT)

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