The seasonality of butterflies in a semi-evergreen forest: Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, northeastern India

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Arun P. Singh
Lina Gogoi
Jis Sebastain

Abstract

A study spanning 3.7 years on the butterflies of Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary GWS (21km2), a semi-evergreen forest, in Jorhat District of Assam, northeastern India revealed 211 species of butterflies belonging to 115 genera including 19 papilionids and seven ‘rare’ and ‘very rare’ species as per Evans list of the Indian sub-continent (Great Blue Mime Papilio paradoxa telearchus; Brown Forest BobScobura woolletti; Snowy Angle Darpa pteria dealbatahas; Constable Dichorragia nesimachus; Grey Baron Euthalia anosia anosia; Sylhet Oakblue Arhopala silhetensis; Branded Yamfly Yasoda tripunctata). The butterflies showed a strong seasonality pattern in this forest with only one significant peak during the post monsoon (September-October) when 118 species were in flight inside the forest which slowly declined to 92 species in November-December. Another peak (102 species) was visible after winter from March to April. Species composition showed least similarity between pre-monsoon (March-May) and post-monsoon (October-November) seasons. The number of papilionid species were greater from July to December as compared from January to June. The findings of this study suggest that the pattern of seasonality in a semi-evergreen forest in northeastern India is distinct from that of the sub-tropical lowland forest in the Himalaya. Favourable logistics and rich diversity in GWS points to its rich potential in promoting ‘butterfly inclusive ecotourism’ in this remnant forest.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
Singh, A.P., Gogoi, L. and Sebastain, J. 2015. The seasonality of butterflies in a semi-evergreen forest: Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, northeastern India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 7, 1 (Jan. 2015), 6774–6787. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o3742.6774-87.
Section
Communications
Author Biographies

Arun P. Singh, Ecology & Biodiversity Conservation Division, Rain Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box # 136, Jorhat, Assam 785001, India

 Arun P. Singh is working on the ecology and conservation of biodiversity of the Himalaya and northeastern India with special reference to butterflies and birds. Presently, he heads the Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation Division, Rain Forest Research Institute (ICFRE), Jorhat. 

Lina Gogoi, Ecology & Biodiversity Conservation Division, Rain Forest Research Institute, P.O. Box # 136, Jorhat, Assam 785001, India

Lina Gogoi is an environmental science post graduate from Tezpur University, Assam had worked on weathering geochemistry of Lohit River, Dibang River and Dibru Saikhowa National Park. Also worked on ecological studies of butterflies in Arunachal Pradesh at the Rain Forest Research Institute for a short period. Currently working in Tezpur University as a project fellow in biochar related project.

Jis Sebastain, esearch Centre in Botany, Sacred Heart College, Thevara, Kochi, Kerala 682013, India

Jis Sebastian did her MSc in forestry from FRI University in Dehradun, Uttarakhand. She has working experience in Wildlife Trust of India and as JRF in the Rain Forest Research Institute on ecological studies of butterflies in Arunachal Pradesh. Currently perusing PhD research in botany at Sacred Heart College, Cochin, Kerala.

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