Journal of Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 15 April 2021 | 13(4): 18059–18098

 

ISSN 0974-7907 (Online) | ISSN 0974-7893 (Print) 

https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.6010.13.4.18059-18098

#6010 | Received 17 April 2020 | Final received 24 March 2021 | Finally accepted 05 April 2021

 

 

Mammals of northeastern India: an updated checklist

 

Nazimur Rahman Talukdar 1, Parthankar Choudhury 2, Rofik Ahmed Barbhuiya 3, Firoz Ahmad 4,

Deborah Daolagupu 5 & Jyoti Bikash Baishya 6

 

1,2,3,5,6 Wildlife Conservation Research Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Assam University, Silchar, Assam 788011, India.

1,3 Centre for Biodiversity and Climate Change Research, Udhayan, Hailakandi, Assam 788155, India.

4 Vindhyan Ecology and Natural History Foundation, 36/30 Station Road, Shivpuri Colony, Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh 231001, India.

1 talukdar.nr89@gmail.com, 2 parthankar@rediffmail.com (corresponding author), 3 rofik.ab91@gmail.com, 4 adfiroz@yahoo.com,

5 ddaolagupu15@yahoo.com, 6 jyoti.dhan@gmail.com

 

 

 

Editor: C. Srinivasulu, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.     Date of publication: 15 April 2021 (online & print)

 

Citation: Talukdar, N.R., P. Choudhury, R.A. Barbhuiya, F. Ahmad, D. Daolagupu & J.B. Baishya (2021). Mammals of northeastern India: an updated checklist. Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(4): 18059–18098. https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.6010.13.4.18059-18098

 

Copyright: © Talukdar et al. 2021. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.  JoTT allows unrestricted use, reproduction, and distribution of this article in any medium by providing adequate credit to the author(s) and the source of publication.

 

Funding: Our research is not funded by any agency or organization.

 

Competing interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

 

Author details: Mr. Nazimur Rahman Talukdar is a PhD student.  His research focuses on diverse aspects of mammalian biology to climate change.  Dr. Parthankar Choudhury is the professor and former head of the Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Assam University, Silchar.  His research focuses on different aspects of mammalian and avian biology.  He has more than 90 scientific publications.  Mr. Rofik Ahmed Barbhuiya is a PhD student.  His current research focuses on behavioral aspects of primates.  Mr. FIROZ AHMAD has MTech (remote sensing) from B.I.T. Mesra, Ranchi, India.  He has more than 20 years of experience in working with forestry, remote sensing, GIS, and photogrammetry and has published more than 65 articles.  Ms. Deborah Daolagupu is a PhD student.  She has been pursuing research in the area of ethnozoology.  Mr. Jyoti Bikash Baishya is a PhD student.  His research focuses on human-elephant conflict and mitigation.

 

Author contribution: All authors have equally contributed in the paper, including data collection, analyzing, and manuscript writing.

 

Acknowledgements: The authors would like to thank the members of Wildlife Conservation Research Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Assam University, Silchar, and Centre for Biodiversity and Climate Change Research, Udhayan, Hailakandi. The authors also thank to all the three anonymous reviewers and the subject editor for their valuable suggestions to improve the checklist.

 

 

Abstract: A systematic review was carried out to prepare a checklist of the mammalian species of northeastern India.  The region is located between two prominent biodiversity hotspots, Himalaya and Indo-Burma. Though it is only 8% of the country, it supports almost half of the country’s total wild flora and fauna.  Ongoing developmental activities such as the construction of roads, electrification, and mining in and around the wildlife habitats have threatened the survival of many species of wildlife.  A lot of literature has been checked to understand the status and distribution of wildlife in the region and the present manuscript is prepared from existing literature.  A total of 267 species representing 11 orders and 38 families from the region have been reported.  A state-wise updated list of species along with their status as per IUCN, WPA (Wildlife Protection Act) of India, 1972 and CITES has been provided which is intended to serve as a baseline data for further research in mammalian fauna of the region.

 

Keywords: Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Chiroptera, Primates, shrews, vertebrates, ungulates, wildlife.

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

The northeastern region (NER) of India (21.57°–29.30°N & 88°–97.30°E) consists of eight states, namely, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim, and Tripura, covering an area of 262,185km2 (NEDFi 2020) (Figure 1).  NER shares 5,182km international border with China in the north, Bhutan in the north-west, Myanmar in the east, Bangladesh in the south-west, and Nepal in the west.  The region constitutes approximately 7.9% of the geographic area of the country.  Almost two-third (approx. 70%) of the area is hilly comprising most parts of Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim, about half of Tripura, one-fifth of Assam, and nine-tenth of Manipur (NEDFi 2020).  Physiographically, the region can be categorized into eastern Himalaya, the Patkai, and the plains of the mighty Brahmaputra Valley, the Barak Valley, and the Imphal Valley.  The climate of the region is predominantly subtropical with hot and humid summers, severe monsoons and mild winters (Jain et al. 2012).  The rainy season generally begins from the end of March and continues till September.  Annual average rainfall varies 1,577–6,002 mm, and temperature ranges 5–40°C with mean relative humidity remaining between 70% and 85% throughout the year (Jhajharia et al. 2009).

The region has large areas of rainforest that supports the habitats of diverse biota.  The region supports a wide variety of flora and fauna due to its diverse habitats and favourable climate.  Numerous research groups, including the Zoological Survey of India (ZSI), the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS), and the Field Museum of Natural History (FMNH), have carried out systematic surveys in different regions in NER, including the mammalian fauna.

Taxonomic accounts of different mammalian fauna have been carried out by various researchers.  Hinton & Lindsay (1926) described the distribution of mammals in northeastern India (Report No. 41, Assam and Mishmi Hills), Ellerman & Morrison-Scott (1951) published checklist of mammals in India and Palaearctic region, Ellerman (1961) emphasized the detailed records of rodents in India, Myanmar, and Sri Lanka.  Corbet & Hill (1992) reviewed the distribution of Indo-Malayan mammals including mammals in northeastern India.  Molur et al. (2002, 2005) reviewed the status of Chiroptera and the non-volant small mammals in southern Asia.  These are important records of mammals in the region. At the beginning of 21st century, ZSI documented mammals of the region under various state series reports such as by Das et al. (1995) for Meghalaya, Bhattacharya & Ghosh (2002) for Tripura, Mandal et al. (2005) for Manipur, De et al. (2006) for Arunachal Pradesh, Mandal et al. (2007) for Mizoram, Chattopadhyay et al. (2006) for Sikkim, and Srivastava et al. (2006) for Nagaland. All these are significant contribution as they mostly published reports from the field study with detailed verification.  Many recent studies (Kumar 2011; Kumar 2014; Kakati & Kabra 2015) reported the records of mammals in particle areas while mammals of southern Asia by Srinivasulu & Srinivasulu (2012), mammals of northeastern India by Choudhury (2013), the checklist of mammals of India by Sharma et al. (2013) are the records of the whole region.  The book “Mammals of northeastern India” by Choudhury (2013) is the most valuable for the taxonomic and geographic distribution of the mammalian species in the region.  Most recent records like distribution list of the bat fauna of Assam by Boro et al. (2018), distribution of Mammals in the Indian Himalayan region by Kamalakannan et al. (2018), mammals in Arunachal Pradesh by Kumar (2018), bat fauna of Meghalaya by Saikia et al. (2018), mammalian fauna in Meghalaya by Lyngdoh et al. (2019), review of the bacular morphology of some Indian bats by Srinivasulu et al. (2020), and some other recent discovery of mammals in the region shows the importance to update the mammalian records of the region. In addition, taxonomic revisions especially of the lower mammalian orders are one of the reasons for updating of the checklist.

 

 

METHODS

 

The present checklist is based on a review of existing literature on the mammalian fauna of northeastern India.  Literature sources include online repositories, like Biodiversity Heritage Library, DeLCON, Google Scholar, PubMed, ResearchGate, and offline journals, articles, and books.  Taxonomic arrangement of the mammals is primarily based on Srinivasulu (2019).  Comments are added for the presence of more than one subspecies in the region to clarify their distribution in the respective states.  Also, IUCN Red List database, Schedules of Indian Wildlife Protection of India, 1972 (IWPA), and appendices of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) were checked to verify the current conservation, and protection (national and international) status of the species.

 

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

 

The current checklist enumerates a total of 267 mammalian species under 139 genera, 38 families, and 11 orders within the political boundary of northeastern India.  A state-wise breakup revealed the presence of 166 species in Arunachal Pradesh, 161 species in Assam, 113 species in Manipur, 169 species in Meghalaya, 116 species in Mizoram, 119 species in Nagaland, 154 species in Sikkim, and 74 species in Tripura (Table 1).  Among the 267 species, the order Chiroptera represents highest number of species (87), followed by rodents (60).  These two orders jointly constitute 54.8% of the total mammal diversity of the NER.  The order Carnivora is also diverse in the region having 46 species, followed by the orders Artiodactyla (26), Soricomorpha (18), Primates (13), and Lagomorpha (9); while the rest of the orders contain one or two species (Figure 2).

Based on recent taxonomic revisions (Benda & Gaisler 2015; Saikia et al. 2017), Pipistrellus pipistrellus, Pipistrellus kuhlii, and Philetor brachypterus are omitted from the present checklist.  Similarly, species such as Hipposideros ater, Ochotona nubrica, and Scotozous dormeri are indicated as doubtful in the checklist due to lack of proper evidence.  Of the 267 mammal species in the region, three species, namely, Assam Mole Shrew Anourosorex assamensis, Namdhapa Flying Squirrel Biswamoyopterus biswasi, and Manipur Bush RatHadromys humei are the endemic to the region. Five extinct species from the region, namely, Red Deer Cervus elaphus, Cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, Banteng Bos javanicus, Sumatran Rhinoceros Dicerorhinus sumatrensis, and Javan Rhinoceros Rhinoceros sondaicus are also included in this list.  Red Deer was earlier recorded from Sikkim which is now locally extinct there but present in other regions of India; while other species are considered to be extinct from India.  Species such as Pteropus giganteus, Barbastella leucomelas, Plecotus auratus, and Miniopterus schreibersii have been substituted with Pteropus medius, Barbastella darjelingensis, Plecotus homochrous, and Miniopterus magnater and following recent taxonomic revisions (Spitzenberger et al. 2006; Benda et al. 2008; Saikia et al. 2018; Srinivasulu et al. 2020).  Species like Alticola stoliczkanus, Crocidura rapax, Episoriculus sacratus, Golunda ellioti, Kerivoula furva, Kerivoula kachinensis, Macaca leucogenys, Miniopterus fuliginosus, Miniopterus magnater, Miniopterus pusillus, Mirostrellus joffrei, Murina jaintiana, Murina pluvialis, Myotis altarium, Petaurista siangensis, and Tylonycteris malayana have been newly recorded from the region and listed in the checklist.

 

Threat Status

The current conservation status of the mammals in the NER as per IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020, CITES 2019, and IWPA 1972 are presented in the checklist (Table 1). Analysis of IUCN Red List categories revealed that 0.7% of the total mammals in NER are Critically Endangered (CR), 7.8% are Endangered (EN), 8.9% are Vulnerable (VU), 5.9% are Near Threatened (NT), 65.3% are Least Concern (LC), and 6.7% are Data Deficient (DD).  Mammals under different IUCN Red List categories belonging to different orders are shown in Table 2.

The northeastern region of India harbours numerous wild mammalian fauna (Images 1–8).  Many new species are recently reported which are important to the incorporated in the regional account, especially taxa like Chiroptera and Rodentia.  Previous studies were mainly focused on large-sized mammals; however, the recent discovery of a few mammals from the region indicates that additional studies require which might help to detect other undiscovered species.

 

 

Table 1. Checklist of mammalian fauna available in the northeastern region (NER) of India.

 

 

Scientific name 

Common English name

AP [167]

AS [161]

MN [114]

MG [169]

MZ [116]

NG [119]

SK [154]

TR [74]

IUCN (Red List Category]

CITES (Appendix]

WPA (Schedule]

Comments

 

I. Order: Proboscidea Illiger, 1811 (Elephants)

 

1. Family: Elephantidae Gray, 1821 (Elephants)

1.

Elephas maximus Linnaeus, 1758

Asian Elephant

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 18, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 38, 41]

[8, 26, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 13, 15, 16, 21, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 38, 40]

 

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 38]

EN

I

I

 

1a.

Elephas maximus indicus G. Cuvier, 1797

 

II. Order: Scandentia Wagner, 1855 (Tree Shrews )

 

2. Family: Tupaiidae Gray, 1825 (Tree Shrews)

2.

Tupaia belangeri (Wagner, 1841)

Northern Tree Shrew

[2, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 24, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 21, 28]

[8, 10, 15, 24, 28, 38]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38]

[6, 8, 15, 28, 36, 38]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38]

LC

NA

NA

 

 

III. Order: Primates Linnaeus, 1758 (Primates)

 

3. Family: Lorisidae Gray, 1821 (Lorises)

3.

Nycticebus bengalensis (Lacepede, 1800)

Slow Loris, Bengal Slow Loris

[8, 10, 15, 24, 25, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 21, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 24, 38, 40]

 

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 38]

EN

I

I

 

 

4. Family: Cercopithecidae Gray, 1821 (Old World Monkeys)

4.

Macaca mulatta  (Zimmermann, 1780)

Rhesus Macaque, Rhesus Monkey

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 18, 24, 25, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 24, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 13, 15, 16, 21, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 15, 24, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 23, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 24, 38, 40]

LC

II

II

 

4a.

Macaca mulatta mulatta (Zimmermann, 1780)

5.

Macaca arctoides (I. Geoffroy, 1831)

Stump-tailed Macaque

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 16, 21, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 24, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 38]

 

[2, 8, 10, 15, 38]

VU

II

II

 

6.

Macaca assamensis (McClelland, 1840)

 

Assamese Macaque

[8, 9, 10, 15, 18, 23, 24, 25, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38]

[8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 15, 16, 21, 24, 38, 40]

[8, 10, 15, 24, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 10, 15, 36, 38]

[8, 10, 15, 38]

NT

II

II

 

The subspecies Macaca assamensis assamensis  is found in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim, and Tripura while Macaca assamensis pelops is found only in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam and Sikkim

6a.

Macaca assamensis assamensis (McClelland, 1839)    

6b.

Macaca assamensis pelops (Hodgson, 1840)

7.

Macaca leonina  (Linnaeus, 1766)

Pig-tailed Macaque

[8, 10, 15, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 36, 38]

[8, 15, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 21, 36, 38]

[8, 15, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 38]

 

[2, 8, 10, 15, 38]

VU

II

II

 

8.

Macaca munzala Sinha et al., 2005

Arunachal Macaque

[15, 18, 25, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EN

NA

II

The species is found in Tawang and West Kameng Districts of Arunachal Pradesh of NE India

9.

Macaca leucogenys Li et al., 2015

White-cheeked Macaque

[7, 39]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NE

NA

NA

 

10.

Macaca thibetana (Milne-Edwards, 1870)

Milne-Edwards’ Macaque, Tibetan Macaque

[19]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NT

NA

NA

Kumar et al. (2005) reported the presence of species based on collected skin. Except this record, no records were reported to confirm the species whether the skins are from the area or borrowed from other areas of its distribution. Recent IUCN updated distribution also has not mentioned the species in Indian territory.

11.

Semnopithecus schistaceus Hodgson, 1840

Central Himalayan Langur, Nepal Gray Langur

 

 

 

 

 

 

[15, 38, 39]

 

LC

NA

NA

 

12.

Trachypithecus pileatus (Blyth, 1843)

Capped Langur, Capped Leaf Monkey, Bonneted Langur

[8, 10, 15, 18, 25, 36, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40, 40]

[2, 8, 15, 23, 24, 36, 40]

[8, 9, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 24, 36, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 24, 36, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40, 40]

 

[2, 8, 15, 38, 40]

VU

I

I

The subspecies Trachypithecus pileatus pileatus is distributed in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, and Nagaland.

Trachypithecus pileatus brahma is found in Arunachal Pradesh.

Trachypithecus pileatus durga is found in Assam, Mizoram, and Tripura.

Trachypithecus pileatus tenebricus is found in Arunachal Pradesh and Assam.

12a.

Trachypithecus pileatus pileatus (Blyth, 1843)

12b.

Trachypithecus pileatus brahma (Wroughton, 1916)

12c.

Trachypithecus pileatus durga (Wroughton, 1916)

12d.

Trachypithecus pileatus tenebricus (Hinton, 1923)

13.

Trachypithecus phayrei (Blyth, 1847)

Phyare's Leaf Monkey, Spectacled Monkey, Phyare's Langur

 

[8, 15, 24, 36, 38, 42]

 

 

[8, 15, 24, 38]

 

 

[8, 15, 24, 36, 38]

EN

I

II

 

14.

Trachypithecus geei (Khajuria, 1956)

Golden Langur, Golden Leaf Monkey

 

[8, 15, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

 

EN

I

I

 

14a.

Trachypithecus geei geei (Khajuria, 1956)

 

5. Family: Hylobatidae Gray, 1871 (Gibbons)

15

 

Hoolock hoolock (Harlan, 1834)

Western Hoolock Gibbon, Hoolock, White-Browned Gibbon

[8, 10, 11, 15, 18, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 15, 24, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 38, 40]

 

[2, 8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

EN

I

I

Trived et al. (2021) establish through genetic studies that the Indian population of Hoolock leuconedys is actually Hoolock hoolock and the subspecies H. h. hoolock and H. h. mishmiensis are subsumed under the species.

 

IV. Order: Rodentia Bowdich, 1821 (Rodents)

 

6. Family: Sciuridae Hemprich, 1820 (Squirrels)

16.

Ratufa bicolor (McClelland, 1839)

Malayan Giant Squirrel, Black Giant Squirrel

[2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 18, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 10, 23, 24, 40]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[2, 6, 8, 10, 23, 24, 38]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[1, 2, 6, 9, 10, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 23, 24, 40]

NT

II

II

 

16a.

Ratufa bicolor gigantea (McClelland, 1839)

17.

Belomys pearsonii (Gray, 1842)

Hairy-footed Flying Squirrel

[6, 8, 9, 10, 25, 28, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 10, 36, 40]

[10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 21, 40]

[10, 15, 24, 28, 36, 38]

[6, 9, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[6, 9, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

 

DD

II

NA

 

17a

Belomys pearsonii pearsonii (Gray, 1842)

18.

*Biswamoyopterus biswasi Saha, 1981

Namdhapa Flying Squirrel

[8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CR

II

Sch II [Part I]

 

19.

Eupetaurus cinereus Thomas, 1988

Woolly Flying Squirrel

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1, 6, 28, 36, 38]

 

EN

II

Sch II [Part I]

 

20.

Hylopetes alboniger (Hodgson, 1836)

Parti-colored Flying Squirrel

[6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 28, 38, 40]

[10, 15]

[6, 9, 10, 15, 28, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 21, 23, 28, 38, 40]

 

[6, 9, 10, 15, 23, 28, 38, 40]

[1, 6, 10, 15, 28, 38]

 

LC

II

Sch II [Part I]

 

20a.

Hylopetes alboniger alboniger (Hodgson, 1836)

21.

Petaurista petaurista (Pallas, 1766)

Red Giant Flying Squirrel

[8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38]

[8, 10, 15, 36]

[15, 23, 38]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[10, 15, 24, 38]

[8, 9, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 36, 38]

 

LC

NA

NA

 

21a.

Petaurista petaurista albiventer (Gray, 1834)

22.

Petaurista magnificus (Hodgson, 1836)

Hodgson's Giant Flying Squirrel

[8, 15, 28, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

[6, 8, 9, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

LC

II

Sch II [Part I]

The subspecies Petaurista magnificus magnificus is found in Sikkim while

Petaurista magnificus hodgsoni is found in both Arunachal Pradesh and Sikkim.

22a.

Petaurista magnificus magnificus (Hodgson, 1836)

22b.

Petaurista magnificus hodgsoni Ghose & Saha, 1981

23.

Petaurista philippensis (Elliot, 1839)

Indian Giant Flying Squirrel

[8, 15]

[8, 36]

 

[8, 9, 15, 21]

[8, 15]

 

 

 

LC

II

Sch II [Part I]

 

23a.

Petaurista philippensis philippensis (Elliot, 1839)

24.

Petaurista caniceps (Gray, 1842)

Spotted Giant Flying Squirrel, Grey-headed Flying Squirrel

[8, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

[6, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

LC

II

NA

 

25.

Petaurista nobilis (Gray, 1842)

Bhutan Giant Flying Squirrel, Gray’s Giant Flying Squirrel

[8, 15, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

[1, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

NT

II

NA

The subspecies Petaurista nobilis nobilis is found in
Sikkim while
Petaurista nobilis singhei is found in
Arunachal Pradesh.

25a.

Petaurista nobilis nobilis (Gray, 1842)

25b.

Petaurista nobilis singhei Saha, 1977

26.

Petaurista mechukaensis (Choudhury, 2007)

Mechka Giant Flying Squirrel

[8, 15]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DD

II

NA

 

27.

Petaurista mishmiensis Choudhury, 2009

Mishmi Giant Flying Squirrel

[8, 15]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NT

II

NA

 

28.

Petaurista siangensis Choudhury, 2013

Mebo Giant Flying Squirrel

[15, 39]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NE

NA

NA

 

29.

Callosciurus erythraeus (Pallas, 1779)

Pallas’ Squirrel, Red-bellied Squirrel

[8, 10, 15, 18, 28, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 21, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 28, 38]

[2, 8, 10, 15, 28, 38]

LC

NA

NA

The subspecies Callosciurus erythraeus erythraeus is found in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, and Sikkim.


Callosciurus erythraeus erythrogaster is found in Assam, Manipur, Nagaland, and Mizoram.


Callosciurus erythraeus intermedia is found in Meghalaya and Tripura

29a.

Callosciurus erythraeus erythraeus (Pallas, 1779)

29b.

Callosciurus erythraeus erythrogaster (Blyth, 1842)

29c.

Callosciurus erythraeus intermedia (Anderson, 1879)

30.

Callosciurus pygerythrus (I. Geoffroy St. Hillaire, 1832)

Irrawaddy Squirrel, Hoary-bellied Squirrel

[8, 10, 15, 18, 28, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 28, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 28, 38]

[10, 15, 24, 28, 38]

[2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 28, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23]

LC

NA

NA

The subspecies Callosciurus pygerythrus lokroides is found in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim while Callosciurus pygerythrus blythi and Callosciurus pygerythrus stevensi are found in Assam.

30a.

Callosciurus pygerythrus lokroides (Hodgson, 1836)

30b.

Callosciurus pygerythrus blythi (Tytler, 1854)

30c.

Callosciurus pygerythrus stevensi (Thomas, 1908)

31.

Dremomys lokriah (Hodgson, 1836)

Orange-bellied Himalayan Squirrel

[6, 8, 10, 15, 18, 25, 28, 38]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[2, 6, 8, 10, 23, 24, 40]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 21, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 6, 10, 24]

[2, 6, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38]

[2, 8, 10, 23, 38]

LC

NA

NA

The subspecies Dremomys lokriah lokriah [Hodgson, 2160] is found in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, Sikkim, and West Bengal.

Dremomys lokriah macmillani is found in the states of Meghalaya, Nagaland, and Tripura.

Dremomys lokriah garonum is found in Meghalaya.

31a.

Dremomys lokriah lokriah (Hodgson, 1836)

31b.

Dremomys lokriah macmillani Thomas, 1916           

31c.

Dremomys lokriah garonum Thomas, 1922

32.

Dremomys pernyi  (Milne-Edwards, 1867)

Perny's Long-nosed Squirrel

[8, 10, 28, 38]

[8, 10, 38, 40]

[10, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

 

 

[8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

 

 

LC

NA

NA

The subspecies Dremomys pernyi pernyi is found in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, and Nagaland
Dremomys pernyi howelli is found in Arunachal Pradesh.

32a.

Dremomys pernyi pernyi (Milne-Edwards, 1867)

32b.

Dremomys pernyi howelli Thomas, 1922

33.

Dremomys rufigenis (Blanford, 1878)

Red-cheeked Squirrel

[28, 36]

[8]

 

 

 

[8, 15, 28, 36, 40]

 

 

LC

NA

NA

 

33a.

Dremomys rufigenis rufigenis (Blanford, 1878)

34.

Funambulus pennantii Wroughton, 1905       

Northern Palm Squirrel,          Five-striped Palm Squirrel

 

 

 

[8, 9, 21, 38]

 

 

[8, 38]

 

LC

IV

II

 

34a.

Funambulus pennantii gangutrianus Ghose et al., 2004

35.

Tamiops macclellandii (Horsfield, 1840)

Himalayan Striped Squirrel

[6, 8, 10, 15, 18, 23, 24, 25, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 16, 21, 23, 24, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 36, 38, 40]

 

LC

NA

NA

 

35a.

Tamiops macclellandi macclellandi (Hodgson, 1840)

36.

Marmota himalayana (Hodgson, 1841)

Himalayan Marmot

[15, 25, 28, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

[1, 6, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

LC

II

III

 

 

7. Family: Spalacidae Gray, 1821 (Spalacids; Bamboo Rats)

37.

Cannomys badius (Hodgson, 1841)

Bay Bamboo Rat, Lesser Bamboo Rat

 

[8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 10, 15, 23, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 24, 28, 38, 40]

[1, 15]

[8, 23]

LC

NA

NA

 

38.

Rhizomys pruinosus Blyth, 1851

Hoary Bamboo Rat

[8, 28]

[8, 9, 23, 24, 40]

[8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[8, 36, 28]

[8, 9, 15, 23, 28, 36, 38, 40]

 

[8, 28]

LC

NA

NA

 

 

8. Family: Cricetidae Fischer, 1817 (New World Rodents; Vole and Hamster)

39.

Alticola stoliczkanus (Blanford, 1875)

Stoliczka's Mountain Vole, Mountain Vole

 

 

 

 

 

 

[15, 38]

 

LC

NA

NA

 

40.

Eothenomys melanogaster (Milne-Edwards, 1872)

Pere David's Vole

[10, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC

NA

NA

 

41.

Neodon sikimensis Horsfield, 1841

Sikkim Vole

 

 

 

 

 

 

[6, 8, 15, 36, 38]

 

LC

NA

NA

 

 

9. Family: Muridae Illiger, 1811 (Old World Rodents; Rats and Mice)

42.

Apodemus draco (Barret-Hamilton, 1900)

South China Wood Mouse, South China Field Mouse

[8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC

NA

NA

 

43.

Apodemus latronum Thomas, 1911

Sichuan Field Mouse

[15, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC

NA

NA

 

44.

Bandicota indica (Bechstein, 1800)

Greater Bandicoot Rat, Large Bandicoot Rat

[8, 15]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 15, 24, 38]

[2, 6, 9, 15, 23, 24, 38]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 15, 21, 24, 38]

 

 

[2, 6, 9, 15, 24]

[2, 15]

LC

NA

Sch IV

 

44a.

Bandicota indica indica (Bechstein, 1800)

44b.

Bandicota indica nemorivaga (Hodgson, 1836)

45.

Bandicota bengalensis (Gray, 1835)

Lesser Bandicoot Rat, Indian Mole Rat

[10, 15]

[8, 15, 28]

[15, 23, 28]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 28]

[15, 24, 28]

[15, 40]

 

[2, 15]

LC

NA

Sch IV

 

45a

Bandicota bengalensis bengalensis (Gray & Hardwicke, 1833)

46.

Berylmys bowersi (Anderson, 1879)

Bower’s White-toothed Rat

[10, 28, 38]

[8, 10, 15]

[10, 15, 28, 38]

[8, 10, 15, 21, 28, 38]

[8, 10, 15, 28, 38]

[10, 28, 38]

 

 

LC

NA

Sch IV

 

46a.

Berylmys bowersi bowersi (Anderson, 1879)

47.

Berylmys mackenziei (Thomas, 1916)

Kenneth’s White-toothed Rat, Mackenzie’s Rat

[8, 38]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 23, 24, 28, 36, 40]

[8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 24, 28, 38]

[8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 28, 36, 38, 40]

 

 

DD

NA

Sch V

 

48.

Berylmys manipulus (Thomas, 1916)

Manipur White-toothed Rat, Manipur Rat

 

[8, 15, 28, 36, 38]

[8, 15, 23, 28, 36, 38, 40]

 

 

[8, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

 

 

DD

NA

NA

 

48a.

Berylmys manipulus manipulus (Thomas, 1916)

49.

Chiropodomys gliroides (Blyth, 1856)

Pencil-tailed Tree Mouse, Penicillate-tailed Tree Mouse

[10, 15, 28, 38]

[8, 23, 38]

[8, 10, 15, 23, 28, 38]

[8, 9, 10, 15, 21, 23, 28, 38]

[15, 38]

[15, 38]

 

 

LC

NA

Sch V

 

49a.

Chiropodomys gliroides gliroides (Blyth, 1856)

50.

Dacnomys millardi Thomas, 1916

Millard's Rat

[8, 10, 15, 23, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

 

 

[8, 10, 15, 23, 28, 36, 38]

[1, 15]

 

DD

NA

NA

 

51.

Diomys crumpi (Thomas, 1917)

Crump's Mouse

 

 

[8, 15, 23, 28, 38, 40]

 

 

 

 

 

DD

NA

NA

 

52.

Golunda ellioti Gray, 1837               

Indian Bush Rat

 

[15, 38]

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC

NA

Sch IV

 

52a.

Golunda ellioti ellioti Gray, 1837

53.

*Hadromys humei (Thomas, 1886)

Hume’s Rat, Manipur Bush Rat

 

[15, 23, 28, 36, 38]

[8, 15, 23, 28, 38, 40]

 

 

 

 

 

EN

NA

NA

 

54.

Leopoldamys edwardsi (Thomas, 1882)

Edward’s Rat, Noisy Rat, Long-tailed Giant Rat

[8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[10, 38]

 

[8, 9, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 38]

[31]

[8, 10, 15, 28, 36, 38, 40]

[10, 36, 40]

 

LC

NA

NA

 

54a.

Leopoldamys edwardsi edwardsi (Thomas, 1882)

55.

Micromys minutus (Pallas, 1771)

Harvest Mouse, Eurasian Harvest Mouse

[8, 15, 28, 38]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 36, 38]

[15, 38]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 28, 36]

 

[8, 15, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

LC

NA

NA

 

55a

Micromys minutus erythrotis (Blyth, 1855)

56.

Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758           

House Mouse

[8, 10, 15, 18, 38, 40]

[2, 6, 8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 38, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 23, 24, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 15, 21, 23, 24, 34, 38, 40]

[8, 15, 24]

[8, 9, 15, 24, 40]

[6, 8, 9, 15, 40]

[2, 8, 15]

LC

NA

Sch IV/V

The subspecies Mus musculus castaneus is found in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam and Meghalaya.      

Musmusculus domesticus is distributed throughout the region.

56a.

Mus musculus castaneus Waterhouse, 1843                        

56b.

Mus musculus domesticus Schwarz & Schwarz, 1943

57.

Mus booduga (Gray, 1837)

Common Indian Field Mouse, Little Indian Field Mouse

[2, 8, 9, 10]

[2, 8, 9]

[8, 40]

[2, 8, 9, 21]

[8]

[8]

 

[2, 8, 9]

LC

NA

Sch IV

 

58.

Mus cervicolor Hodgson, 1845           

Fawn-colored Mouse

[8, 9]

[8, 9, 15, 36]

[8, 15, 23, 28, 38, 40]

[8, 9, 15, 21, 28, 36, 38]

 

 

[36, 38]

 

LC

NA