Study on incidence and pathology of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in Nilgai Boselaphus tragocamelus in Hisar, Haryana, India

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Maneesh Sharma
B.L. Jangir
D. Lather
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3145-389X
G.A. Chandratre
V. Nehra
K.K. Jakhar
G. Narang

Abstract

The present study was conducted on 20 dead carcasses of Nilgai Boselaphus tragocamelus brought to the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences (LUVAS), Hisar for post mortem examination. Thorough necropsy examinations were conducted and the representative samples for parasitic examination were collected. Most of the carcasses showed varying degrees of traumatic injuries (9), external wounds and haemorrhages (5) along with putrefactive changes (6). Intestinal contents and faecal samples were collected and screened for the presence of any parasite by sedimentation and flotation techniques. Out of 20 faecal samples, overall incidence of parasitic gastrointestinal tract infection was 40% (8/20). Out of 20, eight cases revealed presence of coccidian oocysts, however, among the eight cases, one case also revealed mixed infection of Moneizia andStrongylespp.,andanother case with Strongyle and Trichuris spp. Gross pathology of the intestines revealed varying degrees of vascular changes like petechial haemorrhages and the presence of catarrhal exudate. Histopathological examination revealed mild to moderate congestion, fused villi, desquamated mucosal epithelium in focal areas, and infiltration of mononuclear cells mainly lymphocytes. The different developmental stages of coccidian spp.were also observed in the intestinal mucosa. In conclusion, the preliminary study reported the parasitic load and pathological changes in the intestinal tract which further indicated the parasitism of these wild animals which is of immense significance from the epidemiological point of view.

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[1]
Sharma, M., B.L. Jangir, D. Lather, G.A. Chandratre, V. Nehra, K.K. Jakhar and G. Narang 2021. Study on incidence and pathology of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in Nilgai Boselaphus tragocamelus in Hisar, Haryana, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 13, 13 (Nov. 2021), 20124–20127. DOI:https://doi.org/10.11609/jott.6674.13.13.20124-20127.
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