Focus and Scope

What is the Journal of Threatened Taxa or JoTT?
The Journal of Threatened Taxa is an open access and print, peer-reviewed, monthly (not including supplementary and special issues and monographs), rapid, international journal on conservation and taxonomy. The Journal is abbreviated as JoTT. The official shorter version of the Journal name is J. Threat. Taxa

JoTT is a platform for quick and timely publication of research, findings, reviews and other aspects of science related to conservation and taxonomy including subject areas such as ecology, behavior, physiology, methodology, veterinary, diseases, management, models, data, among other relevant topics of conservation biology that have a direct or substantial impact on the knowledge, distribution, status, threats and conservation of native fauna, flora and fungi.

JoTT encourages professional and amateur/upcoming scientists from around the world to publish. The Journal provides assistance and mentors first time writers and writers from non-native English language countries in presenting science to the world.

On an average, JoTT publishes 100 research articles and reviews every year. In 2016, JoTT published 183 articles with 111 research articles, communications and reviews.

JoTT publishes manuscripts under following categories (details):
1. Essays
2. Reviews
3. Monographs
4. Article
5. Communications
6. Short communications
7. Notes
8. Conservation Applications
9. Data Papers
10. Viewpoint
11. Peer Commentaries
12. Response and Reply
13. Corrections
14. Addenda
15. Special Series
16. Book Reviews

Publication Frequency

JoTT is monthly journal with a strict schedule of publication. Regular issues are published online on the 26th of every month. Print copies are mailed out of the office on the same date; in case of a holiday print copies will be mailed the subsequent working day. For manuscripts to be considered for publication in an issue, final galley proofs from the authors must reach the Managing Editor before the 20th of that month failing which the article will be processed for the next month. In exceptional cases delay by a day may be permitted, but the editorial office has to be informed in advance. JoTT also publishes supplementary issues in the form of either a Monograph or Special Issue. These will be published as and when the manuscript is ready for publication, except when it is too close to the date of the regular monthly issue. In that instance the supplementary issue will be published a week or 10 days after the regular issue.

What do you need at the time of submission?

1. Names, affiliations, complete postal address and working email IDs of all authors.
2. Names of 3 preferred reviewers (see guidelines)
3. Names of non-preferred reviewers, if any
4. Manuscript file in .doc or .docx format (preparation guidelines)
5. Figure and images (preparation guidelines)
6. Ethics statement signed by corresponding author

Submission:

1. Only electronic submissions are accepted.
2. Submissions are to be made through the online Open Journal System (OJS).
3. In case of difficulties in submitting through the OJS, submit the manuscript & related files, and ethics statement by email to the Editor, JoTT at sanjay@threatenedtaxa.org.
4. In case of slow internet connectivity submit the manuscript text, tables and figure/image captions through the OJS or by email and high resolution images and figures can be submitted on a CD-Rom/DVD. CD-Rom/DVD should be mailed to – The Chief Editor, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Wildlife Information Liaison Development (WILD) Society, No. 12 Thiruvannamalai Nagar, Saravanampatti-Kalapatti Road, Saravanampatti, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu 641035, INDIA
5. When a manuscript is submitted to JoTT through email the corresponding author must copy the email to all the coauthors.

Important points
1. In case of Short Notes or Short Communications that do not match the requirements of JoTT, but are none‐the‐less of value to conservation, we will forward the manuscripts for consideration in appropriate newsletters such as FrogLeg Newsletter, Reptile Rap Newsletter, Small Mammal Mail Newsletter, MIN or to Zoo’s Print Magazine.
2. Articles submitted to JoTT are received under good faith as being based on original research and has not been submitted, accepted or published elsewhere.
3. After preliminary assessment of the suitability of the manuscript for consideration in JoTT, status of the manuscript will be intimated to the corresponding author within 4 months. If the manuscript is found in need of minor corrections or additions, a tentative acceptance will be communicated in that time. However, final acceptance will be communicated only after satisfactory changes have been carried out and accepted by the Subject Editor & Chief Editor for publication. The date of publication from the date of final acceptance depends on how fast the authors respond to the needs of the editorial office in making corrections to the proofs and submitting all files according to the format required by the publications department.
4. To facilitate speedy publication from the date of first submission, ensure that peers review the manuscript beforehand. This will potentially help your manuscript to be reviewed faster and with lesser suggestions for modification. For authors from countries with English as not the primary language, and for new authors, it is strongly recommended that you also get the text vetted for presentation, English, grammar, typographical errors, consistency, etc. before submitting to JoTT. While we do consider manuscripts on their merit of research finding and conservation need, poorly written manuscripts will have a higher probability of rejection/delays from reviewers and subject editors for difficulty in comprehending the subject.

Article processing charges / Submission / Subscription:
1. Publishing in JoTT is absolutely free.
2. There are no submission charges to publish in JoTT.
3. There are no publication or page charges or membership fees charged at any time for publishing in JoTT.
4. There are no subscription or download charges in JoTT.
5. All publications in JoTT are completely Open Access and are available as HTML and PDF downloads.
6. Withdrawal of manuscript from publication after two weeks from the date of submission will be with a penalty of USD 10/- per page (authors residing outside of India), or INR 500/- per page (for authors residing within India) as indicated in the Checklist (of total pages submitted in A4 size page as per standard JoTT format, including text and illustrations) will be deposited before the submission is considered withdrawn. This is to ensure that the free services of the Journal and that of its editorial board are not misused.  In genuine cases requests will be considered for withdrawal without penalty, but adequate and compelling justification is required.

Reprints:
1. Color and grey scale prints of the journal issues are available at cost. Contact us at threatenedtaxa@gmail.com for more details.
2. Annual print subscription of JoTT is available. Contact us at threatenedtaxa@gmail.com for subscription prices for color and grey scale prints.
3. Prints are available at the JoTT office. To purchase the print edition contact us at ravi@zooreach.org or write to the Managing Editor, Journal of Threatened Taxa c/o Wildlife Information Liaison Development (WILD) Society No. 12, Thiruvannamalai Nagar, Saravanampatti-Kalapatti Road, Saravanampatti, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu 641035, INDIA
4. No reprints will be supplied to any author free of charge.
5. Individual article reprints in color and grey scale can be purchased on a per page cost as decided by the publisher. Contact us at ravi@zooreach.org for more details.

 

Section Policies

Editorial

Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Articles

Articles are detailed studies on a particular topic based on original research that is not published or under publication in any other journal. Articles should be divided into Abstract, Key words, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussions, References.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Communications

Communications are original articles, which have a relatively narrow scope than Articles as they might touch upon only a few aspects of the topic on hand. Communications should be divided into Abstract, Key words, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussions, References.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Reviews

Review articles cover a comprehensive examination of a given topic. Reviews should first set the background of the topic, citing appropriate literature, and then focus on recent findings in context. Authors should not unduly concentrate on their own research and they should provide a balanced view of developments, especially for the fields that are controversial.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Conservation Applications

Conservation Applications are submissions with respect to conservation tools, case studies, policies, practices, management, education, strategies or topics that help to enhance knowledge and application. Manuscripts should have an Abstract, Key words, Introduction and headings that best fit the descriptive text and contents.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Data Papers

Data Papers are articles that provide observation and experimental data by a single or group of authors working on an issue. This describes the methods in detail and observations made along with the actual data for conservationists and readers to benefit from. The length of Data Papers is dependent on the data sets and descriptive notes and observations. This is to provide opportunity to make available invaluable data gathered during studies that are not normally published in entirety in an analysis paper. Video observations and audio records can also form part of Data Papers.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Peer Commentaries

Peer Commentaries are to encourage non-anonymous views/opinions/commentaries on a particular subject from experts. Peer Commentaries can either be on published articles or on unpublished but current events (e.g., re-wilding, introductions, policies) dealing with the aspect at a scientific level rather than personal attacks. Peer Commentaries are usually solicited, but we also consider unsolicited manuscripts.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Short Communications

Short Communications are original articles that focus only on a single aspect of a topic in hand. It should have a brief abstract and the text should be continuous without subheadings. Content heads such as checklists, natural history observations, range extensions, new reports, case studies and clinical briefs with adequately detailed text.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Essays

Experts in the field should write Essays. Essays are detailed views on a particular topic, which offer personal perspectives. Essays should cover a topic of broad importance explained in simple language with less technical jargon. Essays are usually solicited, but we also review unsolicited manuscripts.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Notes

Notes are short original works concerned with natural history observations, checklists, range extensions, etc. They should have an Abstract of less than 50 words. The text should not be divided into subheadings. Content heads such as simple checklists, small observations, new reports, case studies and clinical briefs with limited text.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Viewpoint

Viewpoint provides authors with the opportunity to express or hypothesize new and stimulating insights or perspectives related to the scope of the journal with adherence to scientific and technical presentation.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Response & Reply

Articles published under different sections of JoTT do not portray the views of editors and the authors are solely responsible for the views expressed, integrity of the science and data provided in the publication. Therefore, JoTT provides a forum to express critical comments on recently published articles in JoTT, which, after peer review, are published under the section ‘Response and Reply’ along with a reply from the authors of the article in question. Response to the published article should challenge the main conclusions, results or methodology of the article and should not be concerned with trivial issues, which do not contribute to a healthy scientific discussion. Responses written in aggressive, unprofessional and unscientific language will not be considered by the journal. Neither responses nor replies should be personal attacks. JoTT will send the response to the concerned authors and ask them for their clarifications and reply. Only the authors of the article in question, and no one else should send the Reply, within 10 days after receiving the response.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Book Review

Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Addenda

Addenda may provide an update on the information given in the main paper at the proof stage or after publication. They can also contain important missed out points or references in the published manuscript either because authors were unaware of some study or a study was published at a similar time. Authors who wish to publish such addendums should send an appeal to the Editor. Addenda will be peer reviewed before publication. Addenda should not challenge the major findings of the main paper.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Corrections

JoTT sends galley proofs to all authors and it is insisted that all authors read it carefully and correct any minor issues in the galley proof stage itself. However, if some mistakes are found after publication authors may send an appeal to the Editor to publish a correction in the upcoming issue of JoTT.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Special Series

JoTT publishes articles in special series dedicated to a particular topic or a region (e.g., Threatened Taxa, Rocky Plateaus, Western Ghats, Key Biodiversity Areas). Special series articles can be published as a stand-alone issue or as a part of the regular issue as a continuing series so as to publish as and when the article is peer reviewed and ready.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Monograph

Monographs are voluminous works that provide a complete or near complete study on a particular topic. Monographs must contain a detailed Table of Contents, Abstract, Key words, Introduction and the text can be broken down into various subheadings depending on the topic.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Miscellaneous

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed
 

Peer Review Process

1. JoTT follows the double-blind peer review process.
2. Three referees will review all manuscripts, except those solicited from experts.
3. Opinions, responses, replies, rejoinders, corrections and addenda will be reviewed for facts.
4. JoTT identifies subject editors only after the initial round of reviews. The Subject Editor will be picked from one of the initial reviewers or a new subject expert will be identified.
5. Every manuscript will be assigned to a Subject Editor who, along with the Chief Editor, will be responsible in making final editorial decisions.
6. The Subject Editor’s name will appear on the final published paper unless anonymity is requested.
7. All reviews are double blind. However, should the reviewer wish to know the author names, the reviewer will have to reveal their name to the authors.
8. Reviewers and subject editors of JoTT are volunteers. Although reviewer comments are expected within a month sometimes due to requests for extension from reviewers and non-availability of subject reviewers, the review process may take longer than 3 months.

 

Publication Frequency

JoTT maintains a strict schedule of publication. Regular issues are published online on the 26th of every month. Print copies are mailed out of the office on the same date; in case of a holiday print copies will be mailed the subsequent working day. For manuscripts to be considered for publication in an issue, final galley proofs from the authors must reach the Managing Editor before the 20th of that month failing which the article will be processed for the next month. In exceptional cases delay by a day may be permitted, but the editorial office has to be informed in advance. JoTT also publishes supplementary issues in the form of either a Monograph or Special Issue. These will be published as and when the manuscript is ready for publication, except when it is too close to the date of the regular monthly issue. In that instance the supplementary issue will be published a week or 10 days after the regular issue.

 

Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

 

Archiving

The Journal of Threatened Taxa utilizes the LOCKSS system to create a distributed archiving system among participating libraries and permits those libraries to create permanent archives of the journal for purposes of preservation and restoration.CLOCKSS system has permission to ingest, preserve, and serve this Archival Unit.  Articles of JoTT are also archived in Biotaxa.

 

What does 'threatened taxa' mean?

One of the first things to come to the mind about ‘threatened taxa’ is that of the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and the classification of the threatened categories in that, viz.: Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable. However, the Journal of Threatened Taxa does not restrict itself to taxa (phyla, groups, families, orders, species, subspecies, varieties, forms or populations) that are threatened with extinction as defined by the IUCN Red List. The term “threatened” in the Journal of Threatened Taxa is defined broadly to include all forms of taxa and their ecosystems, with the premise that the natural world today is threatened and therefore its taxa. Taxa could be threatened in several different ways, not only in their status in the wild. Lack of knowledge about a species or subspecies or a population is a threat as priorities could be compromised due to deficiency in data. Taxa scientifically described for the first time are under threat from data deficiency in their distribution, status, ecological needs, etc. Any taxon could be under threat in a location due to the changes in habitat or quality. Ecological changes, changes in land use, socio-economic changes, human influenced changes, alien introduced species, wrong reintroduction practices, new emerging diseases, social and political unrest, improperly planned national and international wildlife and conservation legislations, constant changes in taxonomy, global climate change, and other factors that keep our environment and ecosystems in a constant flux can have widespread or localized impacts on taxa. In some instances even the so-called Least Concern species could be impacted locally or widely due to the above factors. Of late, the onus is on select species with known ecological roles, or with a beneficial role in the ecosystem (for humans), which overshadows the need or importance for lesser-known and less-understood taxa inherently threatening them. The aim of the Journal of Threatened Taxa is to eliminate threats to taxa and the ecosystems by rapid and timely publication of important taxonomic and conservation findings through a proper process of peer review.

 

The Logo

The beautiful JoTT logo is designed by the famous Stephen Nash based on the concept of “Green Man” found in cultural contexts almost throughout the world. Traditionally, the Green Man is depicted by a human or animal face with plant material enveloping the sides or originating from within the face. Its relevance to today’s world is much stronger, its inherent symbolism of humans being an integral part of nature and the need to nurture all natural forms around us. While developing the Green Man logo, several thoughts went into the design and after a couple of draft renditions, the brilliant wildlife artist Stephen Nash developed this version which encapsulates the concept of the Green Man and brings out the aspects of biodiversity on the planet. For understanding the logo and the significance it holds to all of us, please read Stephen Nash’s contribution below. “Seeing the Green Man for the first time, many years ago in an old church near where I grew up in England, was a deeply moving experience for me. There was something that I could, subconsciously, 'read' in its symbolism, which went well beyond normal memory and experience. When subsequently I read James Lovelock's 'Gaia' hypothesis, in which he talks of the life-forms and ecosystems of the planet being so profoundly and delicately interconnected as to comprise a vast single functioning organism, and Hildegard von Bingen's ideas on 'veriditas', the 'greenness' which she felt were the manifestations of cosmic energies, and most recently Edward O. Wilson's 'Biophilia', that need we have for the company of other species, without which, as Chief Seattle put it, humanity would "die of a loneliness of spirit", it all seemed to make sense. Buddhism also points the way, urging as it does compassion towards all creatures, but I have learned more recently that forms of the Green Man are found in many parts of the world, and that the image may be linked inextricably with reverence for the Mother Goddess, perhaps the ancestor of all cultures. How appropriate then, as our relationship with our fellow-creatures has reached a point of crisis, and science has shown us that the survival of so many vital parts of our species' biological support structure is so uncertain, that the interdependence of all life is being appreciated ever more, and the Green Man is the visual symbol for, and the encapsulation of, that renewed awareness”.

 

Policy against Scientific Misconduct

JoTT supports ethics in scientific studies and scientific writing. JoTT does not tolerate any form of scientific misconduct including (1) fabrication (creating false data), (2) falsification (manipulation of data), (3) plagiarism (copying ideas, statements, results, etc. from other author/s without acknowledging the author/s and the source), (4) self-plagiarism (multiple identical publications with major overlap in ideas, data, inferences, etc.), and (5) duplicate or multiple submissions of the same manuscript to other journals while in consideration at JoTT. Any form of scientific misconduct is unacceptable and JoTT reserves the right to expose such work with appropriate level of penalty suitable for the given situation. Note that scientific misconduct does not include honest errors, errors in judgment, difference of opinion or misconduct unrelated to the publication being criticized.

In the instance of suspected scientific misconduct, JoTT will follow the protocol given below.

1. Any case of suspected misconduct, the Chief Editor and Associate/Subject Editors will investigate objectively and JoTT will take appropriate actions suitable for the crime.
2. If a submitted manuscript is found to be guilty of any form of scientific misconduct during the reviewing or editing process, JoTT will not only reject the manuscript but the respective head of the institution of all the authors and the funding agency(s) will be informed about the misconduct. If in doubt of fabrication or falsification, JoTT can ask for raw data, analysis, photographs, genomic sequences, gel pictures, etc. used by the authors.
3. If the authors of a published paper are accused of any form of scientific misconduct, JoTT will take appropriate actions in the following order. (1) The subject editor and/or referees of the paper will be asked to comment on any evidence of scientific misconduct. (2) If the investigation suspects misconduct a response will be asked from the authors along with raw data, analysis, photographs, trace files of genomic sequences, gel pictures, etc., if applicable. (3) If the response from authors is satisfactory revealing a mistake or misunderstanding, the matter will be resolved. If not, JoTT will withdraw the paper from the online version and appropriate announcements will be placed in upcoming issue. (4) JoTT will also inform the respective heads of the institutions of all the authors and the funding agency(s) about the misconduct. JoTT expects reviewers/subject editors of manuscripts to keep the ideas or data of the authors confidential and they should not steal author’s ideas, plagiarize author’s work or make a decision to reject because of conflict of interest. Authors have a right to make an appeal to the Chief Editor if they have substantial grounds to believe that such malpractice has occurred regarding their manuscript. If such allegations are proved correct they will be treated seriously and appropriate actions will be taken. Complaints regarding authorship problems where individuals have been inappropriately excluded, or included without their knowledge, as well as accusations of guest, ghost, or gift authorship will be treated seriously by JoTT and appropriate announcements will be placed in the upcoming issue. JoTT may also inform the respective heads of the institutions of all the authors and the funding agency(s) about the misconduct.

Suggested reading:

Anon (2011). European Science Foundation released a Code of Conduct on Research Integrity. Published by ALLEA (All European Academies), pp. 24. Available free at- http://www.esf.org/fileadmin/Public_documents/Publications/Code_Conduct_ResearchIntegrity.pdf
Dahanukar, N. & S. Molur (2012). Scientific conduct and misconduct: honesty is still the best policy. Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(9): 2845-2848.
Errami, M. & H. Garner (2008). A tale of two citations. Nature 451: 397-399.
Long, T.C., M. Errami, A.C. George, Z. Sun & H.R. Garner (2009). Responding to possible plagiarism. Science 323: 1293-1294.
Mukunda, N. & A. Joshi (2008). Note on plagiarism. Journal of Genetics 87: 99.
Rathod, S.D. (2010). Combating plagiarism: a shared responsibility. Indian Journal of Medical Ethics 7: 173-175.
Redman, B.K. & J.F. Merz (2008). Scientific misconduct: do the punishments fit the crime? Science 321: 775
Resnik, D.B. (2003). From Baltimore to Bell Labs: reflections on two decades of debate about scientific misconduct. Accountability in Research 10: 123-135.
Titus, S.L., J.A. Wells & L.J. Rhoades (2008). Repairing research integrity. Nature 453: 980-982.

 

JoTT Policy against Predatory Journals

In the recent mushrooming of predatory journals around the world, JoTT has taken a stand against encouraging citations from these journals. For the time being, Beall’s Lists on predatory publishers and stand-alone journals are used as standard reference for determining predatory journals. In this regard, a recent Editorial in JoTT highlighted the steps taken by JoTT, which are also listed below for authors to take cognizance while preparing manuscrips.

(1) JoTT discourages citation of work published in journals from any of the known predatory publishers or stand-alone predatory/deceptive journals. Authors must refer to the list of publishers and list of stand-alone journals at www.scholarlyoa.com (Beall 2015a).
(2) JoTT discourages citation of work from journals that are not yet listed in Beall (2015a) but fulfill the criteria set by Beall (2015b).
(3) If the author must cite the work published in a predatory journal, as it is important in the study, they should cite it in the text as ‘published in a predatory journal’ (since JoTT does not trust that such work was published following scientific procedure of peer review). For instance, “........ was suggested by Author et al. (published in a predatory journal)” or “..... was suggested (Author et al., published in a predatory journal)”.
(4) Although JoTT does not consider work published in predatory journals as scientifically valid, authors are advised not to reproduce the content of such work as a whole or in part in JoTT as all such frauds will be considered scientific misconducts of the form ‘plagiarism’. Such accusations will be objectively analyzed and penalized appropriately as stated in an earlier JoTT Editorial on policy (Dahanukar & Molur 2012).
(5) JoTT understands the limitations of the present listing of predatory publications by Beall (2015a) as applied to only open-access journals, and will include predatory/deceptive subscription or toll-access journals as identified by other systematic and authentic evaluators.

Suggested reading:

Beall, J. (2012). Predatory publishers are corrupting open access. Nature 489: 179; http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/489179a
Beall, J. (2015a). http://scholarlyoa.com. Accessed on 18 August 2015.
Beall, J. (2015b). Criteria for Determining Predatory Open-Access Publishers. 3rd Edition. https://scholarlyoa.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/criteria-2015.pdf. Accessed on 19 August 2015.
Bartholomew, R.E. (2014). Science for sale: the rise of predatory journals. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 107: 384–385; http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0141076814548526
Bohanon, J. (2013). Who’s afraid of peer review? Science 342: 60–65. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.342.6154.60
Butler, D. (2013). The dark side of publishing. Nature 495: 433–435. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/495433a
Caplan, A.L. (2015). The problem of publication-pollution denialism. Mayo Clinic Proceedings 90: 565–566; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.02.017
Clark, J. (2015). How to avoid predatory journals - a five point plan. http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2015/01/19/jocalyn-clark-how-to-avoid-predatory-journals-a-five-point-plan/. Accessed 05 June 2015.
Clark, J. & R. Smith (2015). Firm action needed on predatory journals. The British Medical Journal 350: h210; http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h210
Dahanukar, N. & S. Molur (2012). Scientific conduct and misconduct: honesty is still the best policy. Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(9): 2845–2848; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.04092012.2845-8
Foster, K.R. & K.L. Chopra (2012). Journals of plagiarism. Current Science 103: 1258–1259
Kearney, M.H. & The Inane Predatory Publishing Practices Collaborative (2015). Predatory publishing: what authors need to know. Research in Nursing and Health 38: 1–3; http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nur.21640
Lakhotia, S.C. (2015). Predatory journals and academic pollution. Current Science 108(8): 1407–1408.
Raghavan, R., N. Dahanukar, J.D.M. Knight, A. Bijukumar, U. Katwate, K. Krishnakumar, A. Ali & S. Philip (2014). Predatory journals and Indian ichthyology. Current Science 107: 740–742.
Raghavan, R., N. Dahanukar & S. Molur (2015). Curbing academic predators: JoTT’s policy regarding citation of publications from predatory journals. Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(10): 7609–7611; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o4388.7609-11
Raghavan, R., N. Dahanukar & S. Molur (2015). Practicality versus idealism for curbing predatory publishing: a reply to Teixeira da Silva. Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(15): 8307–8308; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2472.7.15.8307-8308
Raghavan, R., S. Philip, N. Dahanukar & A. Ali (2013). Freshwater fish biodiversity of India: a response to Sarkar et al. (2013). Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 23: 547–554; http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11160-013-9315-9
Raju, N.V. (2013). How does UGC identify predatory journals? Current Science 104(11): 1461–1462.
Silas, E.G. (2003). History and development of fisheries research in India. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 100(2&3): 502–520.
Smith-Vaniz, W.F. & K.E. Carpenter (2015). Book review: The carangids of India - a monograph. Fish and Fisheries 16: 543–546; http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/faf.12099
Xia, J., J.L. Harmon, K.G. Connolly, R.M. Donnelly, M.R. Anderson & H.A. Howard (2015). Who publishes in predatory journals? Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology 66(7): 1406–1417; http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.23265

 

Conflict of Interest

1. It is necessary that authors should disclose any conflict related to the manuscript while submitting the manuscript for consideration in JoTT. The conflict of interest will be published along with the article. If the study was funded and there was no conflict of interest the authors must mention “Funding source had no role in study design, data collection, interpretation of results and manuscript writing”. If there is no conflict of interest, authors should mention “Declared none”.
2. Reviewers and subject editors are required to disclose any conflict of interest in connection with the manuscript, authors, biases or competing interests.

 

Reproducing Copyrighted Material

1. If authors wish to use materials from any source published, online or otherwise, necessary permissions must be sought in writing from the authors or publishers who are the copyright holders.
2. In case of the original material registered under Creative Commons license authors should refer to the appropriate attribution and notify JoTT regarding the same.

 

Editorial Team

EDITORS

Founder & Chief Editor
Dr. Sanjay Molur
Wildlife Information Liaison Development (WILD) Society & Zoo Outreach Organization (ZOO), 12 Thiruvannamalai Nagar, Saravanampatti, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu 641035, India

Managing Editor
Mr. B. Ravichandran, WILD, Coimbatore, India

Associate Editors
Dr. B.A. Daniel, ZOO, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu 641035, India
Dr. Ulrike Streicher, Wildlife Veterinarian, Eugene, Oregon, USA
Ms. Priyanka Iyer, ZOO, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu 641035, India
Dr. Manju Siliwal, WILD, Dehra Dun, India
Dr. Meena Venkataraman, Mumbai, India

Editorial Board
Ms. Sally Walker
Founder/Secretary, ZOO, Coimbatore, India

Dr. Robert Lacy
Department of Conservation Biology, Chicago Zoological Society (also known as the Brookfield Zoo), Brookfield, Illinois 60513 USA; and Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago

Dr. Russel Mittermeier
Executive Vice Chair, Conservation International, Arlington, Virginia 22202, USA

Dr. Thomas P. Husband
Professor, Wildlife Biology, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA

Dr. Jacob V. Cheeran
Thrissur, India

Prof. Mewa Singh Ph.D., FASc, FNA, FNASc, FNAPsy
Ramanna Fellow and Life-Long Distinguished Professor, Biopsychology Laboratory, and Institute of Excellence, University of Mysore, Mysuru, Karnataka 570006, India; Honorary Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore; and Adjunct Professor, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore

Dr. Ulrike Streicher, DVM
Wildlife Veterinarian / Wildlife Management Consultant, 1185 East 39th Place, Eugene, OR 97405, USA

Stephen D. Nash
Scientific Illustrator, Conservation International, Dept. of Anatomical Sciences, Health Sciences Center, T-8, Room 045, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8081, USA

Dr. Fred Pluthero
Toronto, Canada

Dr. Martin Fisher
Cambridge, UK

Dr. Ulf Gärdenfors
Professor, Swedish Species Information Center, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden

Dr. John Fellowes
Honorary Assistant Professor, The Kadoorie Institute, 8/F, T.T. Tsui Building, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong

Dr. Philip S. Miller
Senior Program Officer, Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (SSC/IUCN), 12101 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley, MN 55124, USA

Prof. Dr. Mirco Solé
Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Vice-coordenador do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Zoologia, Rodovia Ilhéus/Itabuna, Km 16 (45662-000) Salobrinho, Ilhéus - Bahia - Brasil

English Editors
Mrs. Mira Bhojwani, Pune, India
Dr. Fred Pluthero, Toronto, Canada
Mr. P. Ilangovan, Chennai, India

Layout/Design/Production
Mrs. Latha Ravikumar, ZOO/WILD, Coimbatore, India
Mrs. Radhika Suresh, ZOO, Coimbatore, India
Mrs. Geetha Kannan, ZOO, Coimbatore India
Mr. Arul Jagadish, ZOO, Coimbatore India
Mr. Ravindran, ZOO, Coimbatore India

Fundraising/Communications
Mrs. Payal B. Molur, Coimbatore, India

 

Editors/Reviewers

Subject Editors 2013-2014
Fungi
Dr. B. Shivaraju, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Prof. Richard Kiprono Mibey, Vice Chancellor, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya
Dr. R.K. Verma, Tropical Forest Research Institute, Jabalpur, India

Plants
Dr. N.P. Balakrishnan, Ret. Joint Director, BSI, Coimbatore, India
Dr. Shonil Bhagwat, Open University and University of Oxford, UK
Prof. D.J. Bhat, Retd. Professor, Goa University, Goa, India
Dr. Ferdinando Boero, Università del Salento, Lecce, Italy
Dr. Dale R. Calder, Royal Ontaro Museum, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Dr. Cleofas Cervancia, Univ. of Philippines Los Baños College Laguna, Philippines
Dr. F.B. Vincent Florens, University of Mauritius, Mauritius
Dr. Merlin Franco, Curtin University, Malaysia
Dr. Francesco Dal Grande, Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung, Frankfurt
Dr. V. Irudayaraj, St. Xavier’s College, Palayamkottai, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. B.S. Kholia, Botanical Survey of India, Gangtok, Sikkim, India
Dr. Christoph Kueffer, Institute of Integrative Biology, Zürich, Switzerland
Dr. Pankaj Kumar, Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden Corporation, Hong Kong
Dr. V. Sampath Kumar, Botanical Survey of India, Howrah, West Bengal, India
Dr. H.C. Nagaveni, Institute of Wood Science and Technology, Bengaluru, India
Dr. K.S. Negi, NBPGR, Nainital District, Uttarakhand, India
Dr. A.J. Solomon Raju, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, India
Dr. Vijayasankar Raman, University of Mississippi, USA
Dr. B. Ravi Prasad Rao, Sri Krishnadevaraya University, Anantpur, India
Dr. K. Ravikumar, FRLHT, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Prof. Satish C. Verma, Panjab University, Chandigarh, Punjab, India
Dr. Aparna Watve, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Invertebrates
Dr. Deepak Apte, Bombay Natural Hisotry Society, Mumbai, India.
Dr. R.K. Avasthi, Rohtak University, Haryana, India (Orthoptera)
Dr. D.B. Bastawade, Maharashtra, India (Araneae)
Dr. Partha Pratim Bhattacharjee, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, India
Dr. Ferdinando Boero, Università del Salento, Lecce, Italy
Dr. Kailash Chandra, Zoological Survey of India, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. Arthur Y.C. Chung, Sabah Forestry Department, Sandakan, Sabah, Malaysia
Dr. H.C. Paulo Corgosinho, Bairro Universitário, Frutal, Brazil
Dr. B.A. Daniel, ZOO/WILD, Coimbatore, India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. Ansie Dippenaar-Schoeman, University of Pretoria, Queenswood, South Africa (Aran)
Dr. Rory Dow, National Museum of natural History Naturalis, The Netherlands (Odonata)
Dr. Alexander Ereskovsky, IMBE, Marseille, France (Spongillidae)
Dr. Brian Fisher, California Academy of Sciences, USA
Dr. Richard Gallon, llandudno, North Wales, LL30 1UP
Dr. Hemant V. Ghate, Modern College, Pune, India
Dr. Mohammad Hayat, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India (Hymenoptera)
Dr. Tadashi Kawai, Wakkanai Fisheries Research Institute, Hokkaido, Japan (Crustacea)
Dr. S. Ajmal Khan, Annamalai University, Parangipettai, India (Corals)
Dr. Ragnar Kinzelbach, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany
Dr. Ian J. Kitching, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, UK
Dr. Okan Külköylüoğlu, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey (Crustacea)
Dr. Jesse Leland, Southern Cross University, New South Wales, Australia (Crustacea)
Dr. George Mathew, Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi, India
Dr. Mohilal Meitei, Manipur University, Camchipur, Manipur, India
Dr. John C. Morse, Clemson University, Long Hall, Clemson, USA
Late Dr. T.C. Narendran, (Retired) Professor, University of Calicut, Kerala, India
Dr. John Noyes, Natural History Museum, London, UK
Dr. Albert G. Orr, Griffith University, Nathan, Australia (Odonata)
Dr. Renkang Peng, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia (Heteroptera)
Dr. Nancy van der Poorten, Toronto, Canada
Dr. C. Raghunathan, Zoological Survey of India, Andaman and Nicobar Islands
Dr. R. Ramanibai, Guindy Campus, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. Brett C. Ratcliffe, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA
Dr. Klaus Ruetzler, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Dr. Kareen Schnabel, NIWA, Wellington, New Zealand (Crustacea)
Dr. R.M. Sharma, (Retd.) Scientist, Zoological Survey of India, Pune, India (Lepidoptera, Coleoptera)
Dr. Peter Smetacek, Butterfly Research Centre, Bhimtal, India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. Manju Siliwal, WILD, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India (Araneae)
Dr. G.P. Sinha, Botanical Survey of India, Allahabad, India (Lichens)
Dr. K.G. Sivaramakrishnan, Madras Christian College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. K.A. Subramanian, Zoological Survey of India, New Alipore, Kolkata, India
Dr. P.M. Sureshan, Zoological Survey of India, Kozhikode, Kerala, India (Hymenoptera)
Dr. Martin B.D. Stiewe, The Natural History Museum, UK (Mantodea)
Dr. R. Varatharajan, Manipur University, Imphal, Manipur, India
Dr. Eduard Vives, Museu de Ciències Naturals de Barcelona, Terrassa, Spain
Dr. John Veron, Coral Reef Foundation, Townsville, Australia
Dr. Hui Xiao, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang, China
Dr. James Young, Hong Kong Lepidopterists’ Society, Hong Kong

Fishes
Dr. Neelesh Dahanukar, IISER, Pune, Maharashtra, India
Dr. Carl Ferraris, Smithsonian Institution, Portland, USA
Dr. M. Afzal Khan, Department of Zoology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
Dr. Topiltzin Contreras MacBeath, Universidad Autónoma del estado de Morelos, México
Dr. Heok Hee Ng, National University of Singapore, Science Drive, Singapore
Dr. Rajeev Raghavan, St. Albert’s College, Kochi, Kerala, India
Dr. Lukas Rüber, Department of Vertebrates, Natural History Museum, Switzerland
Dr. Anjana Silva, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Sri Lanka
Dr. Robert D. Sluka, Chiltern Gateway Project, A Rocha UK, Southall, Middlesex, UK
Dr. Kevin Smith, IUCN, Cambridge, UK
Dr. E. Vivekanandan, Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Chennai, India
Dr. W. Vishwanath, Manipur University, Imphal, India
Dr. J. Jerald Wilson, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Dr. Davor Zanella, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia

Amphibians
Dr. Indraneil Das, Sarawak, Malaysia
Dr. Sushil K. Dutta, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Dr. Annemarie Ohler, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris, France

Reptiles
Late Dr. S. Bhupathy, SACON, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. Llewellyn D. Densmore, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, USA
Dr. Eric Smith, University of Texas, Arlington, USA
Dr. Gernot Vogel, Heidelberg, Germany
Dr. Raju Vyas, Vishwamitri River Project, Vadodara, India

Birds
Dr. Hem Sagar Baral, Charles Sturt University, NSW Australia
Dr. Chris Bowden, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Sandy, UK
Dr. Priya Davidar, Pondicherry University, Kalapet, Puducherry, India
Dr. J.W. Duckworth, IUCN SSC, Bath, UK
Dr. Rajah Jayapal, SACON, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. Rajiv S. Kalsi, M.L.N. College, Yamuna Nagar, Haryana, India
Dr. Crawford Prentice, Nature Management Services, Jalan, Malaysia
Dr. V. Santharam, Rishi Valley Education Centre, Chittoor Dt., Andhra Pradesh, India
Dr. C. Srinivasulu, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India
Dr. K.S. Gopi Sundar, International Crane Foundation, Baraboo, USA
Dr. Gombobaatar Sundev, Professor of Ornithology, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Prof. Reuven Yosef, International Birding & Research Centre, Eilat, Israel

Mammals
Dr. Giovanni Amori, CNR - Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Rome, Italy
Dr. Daniel Brito, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Brazil
Dr. Anwaruddin Chowdhury, Guwahati, India
Dr. P.S. Easa, Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi, India
Dr. Colin Groves, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Dr. Cecília Kierulff, Victorville, California
Dr. Kristin Leus, Copenhagen Zoo, Annuntiatenstraat, Merksem, Belgium
Dr. David Mallon, Zoological Society of London, UK
Dr. Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni, Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico
Dr. Sanjay Molur, WILD/ZOO, Coimbatore, India
Dr. Shomita Mukherjee, SACON, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. P.O. Nameer, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur, Kerala, India
Dr. Jill Pruetz, Iowa State University, Ames, USA
Dr. Ian Redmond, UNEP Convention on Migratory Species, Lansdown, UK
Dr. Heidi S. Riddle, Riddle’s Elephant and Wildlife Sanctuary, Arkansas, USA
Dr. Kumaran Sathasivam, Marine Mammal Conservation Network of India, India
Dr. Karin Schwartz, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia.
Dr. Christoph Schwitzer, University of the West of England, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 3HA
Dr. Jodi L. Sedlock, Lawrence University, Appleton, USA
Dr. Lala A.K. Singh, Bhubaneswar, Orissa, India
Dr. Mewa Singh, Mysore University, Mysore, India
Dr. Meena Venkataraman, Mumbai, India
Dr. Erin Wessling, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
Dr. Dietmar Zinner, German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany

Other Disciplines
Dr. S. Jayakumar, Pondicherry University, Puducherry, India (Climate Change)
Dr. Jeff McNeely, IUCN, Gland, Switzerland (Communities)
Dr. Stephen D. Nash, Scientific Illustrator, State University of New York, NY, USA (Scientific Illustrator)
Dr. Mandar S. Paingankar, University of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Molecular)
Dr. Jack Tordoff, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund, Arlington, USA (Communities)

Reviewers (2013-2014)
Fungi
Dr. V.B. Hosagoudar
, TBGRI, Palode, Kerala, India
Dr. R. Ramasubbu, Gandhigram Rural University, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. B.C. Suman, University of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan, India

Plants
Dr. P. Arjun, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa
Dr. Kashinath Bhattacharya, Visva-Bharati University, West Bengal, India
Dr. Mandar Datar, Agharkar Research Institute, Pune, Maharashtra, India
Dr. M.K. Janarthanam, Goa University, Goa, India
Dr. K. Karthigeyan, Botanical Survey of India, India
Dr. P. Lakshminarasimhan, Botanical Survey of India, Howrah, India
Dr. Subhasis Panda, Darjeeling Govt. College, Darjeeling, West Bengal
Dr. Arun K. Pandey, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Dr. Vatsavaya S. Raju, Kakatiay University, Warangal, Andhra Pradesh, India
Dr. M.K. Vasudeva Rao, Shiv Ranjani Housing Society, Pune, Maharashtra, India
Dr. N.D. Paria, Department of Botany, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India
Dr. Swapna Prabhu, Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Dr. P. Venkateswara Prasanna, Botanical Survey of India, Andhra Pradesh, India
Dr. V.S. Ramachandran, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. A.K. Sreekala, JNTBGRI, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
Dr. K.R. Sridhar, Mangalore University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
Dr. S.K. Srivastava, Botanical Survey of India, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India
Dr. P.L. Uniyal, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Dr. P. Venu, Botanical Survey of India, Howrah, India

Invertebrates
Dr. S. Arularasan, Annamalai University, Parangipettai, India (Molluscs)
Dr. Himender Bharti, Punjabi University, Punjab, India
Dr. K.S. Anoop Das, Mampad College, Malappuram District, Kerala, India (Odonata)
Dr. Victor Gapud, University of the Philippines, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines (Odonata)
Mr. Monsoon Jyoti Gogoi, Bokakhat, Assam, India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. M. Ganesh Kumar, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Mettupalayam, Tamil Nadu, India (Araneae)
Dr. Krushnamegh Kunte, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA (Lepidoptera)
Dr. N.A. Aravind Madhyastha, ATREE, Jakkur PO, Bangalore, India (Mollusca)
Dr. Bulganin Mitra, Zoological Survey of India, New Alipore, West Bangal, India (Coleoptera)
Dr. R. Mohanraju, Department of Ocean Studies & Marine Biology, Port Blair, India (Corals)
Dr. Kalpana Pai, University of Pune, Pune, India (Ostracods)
Dr. Muhamed Jafer Palot, Zoological Survey of India, Kozhikode, Kerala, India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. B. Ramesha, Kerala Agricultural University, Kasaragod District, Kerala, India (Coleoptera)
Mr. Purnendu Roy, Gabriel’s Wharf, London, UK (Lepidoptera)
Dr. Arun P. Singh, Rain Forest Research Institute (ICFRE), Jorhat India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. Sanjay Sondhi, TITLI TRUST, Kalpavriksh, Dehradun, India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. G.K. Srivastava, Gomti Nagar, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India (Coleoptera)
Dr. A.V. Sudhikumar, Christ College, Irinjalakuda, Kerala, India (Araneae)
Dr. Ashish D. Tiple, Vidyabharati College, Seloo, Wardha, Maharashtra, India (Lepidoptera)
Dr. Basudev Tripathy, Zoological Survey of India, New Alipore, India (Mollusca)
Dr. K.K. Vass, Chicago, USA (Macroinvertebrates)
Dr. Bakhtiar Effendi Yahya, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Sabah, Malaysia (Insect)

Fishes
Dr. S. Chellappa, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil
Dr. Shrikant Jadhav, Zoological Survey of India, Akurdi, Pune, Maharashtra, India
Dr. J.A. Johnson, Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India
Dr. J.D. Marcus Knight, Velachery, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. A. Biju Kumar, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
Dr. Madhava Meegaskumbura, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
Dr. Rohan Pethiyagoda, Australian Museum, Australia
Dr. Siby Philip, Nirmalagiri College, Nirmalagiri, Kannur, Kerala, India
Dr. L. Kosygin Singh, Zoological Survey of India, Hilltop, Odisha, India

Amphibians
Dr. K.P. Dinesh, Zoological Survey of India, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. K.V. Gururaja, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, Karanataka, India
Dr. Unmesh Katwate, Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Dr. L.J. Mendis Wickramasinghe, Herpetological Foundation of Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka

Reptiles
Dr. Ashok Captain, Pune, Maharashtra, India
Dr. K.V. Dheeraj, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India
Dr. S.R. Ganesh, Chennai Snake Park, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. Utpal Smart, University of Texas at Arlington, TX 76019-0498, USA
Mr. Jigme Tshelthrim Wangyal, District Forest Office, Trashigang, Bhutan

Birds
Dr. Rajan Amin, The Zoological Society of London, London, England
Dr. Nishith Dharaiya, HNG University, Patan, Gujarat, India
Dr. Dipankar Ghose, WWF-India, Max Muller Marg, New Delhi, INDIA
Dr. V. Gokula, National College, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. R. Suresh Kumar, Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India
Dr. Dhananjai Mohan, Vasant Vihar, Dehradun, India
Dr. Laxman Prasad Poudyal, Shivapuri Nagarjun National Park, Nepal
Dr. Vibhu Prakash, Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Dr. Karan Bahadur Shah, Natural History Museum, Tribhuvan University, Nepal
Dr. Nita Shah, Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India
Dr. Hilloljyoti Singha, Assam University, Silchar, Silchar, Assam, India
Dr. V.C. Soni, Saurashtra University, Maharashtra, India
Dr. Bhargavi Srinivasulu, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India
Dr. Tulsi Subedi, Kathmandu, Nepal

Mammals
Dr. Vidya Athreya, WCS-India, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Dr. Sery Ernest Gonedele Bi, Université de Cocody Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
Dr. Renee M. Borges, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Dr. Dilip Chetry, Gibbon Conservation Centre, Mariani, Jorhat, Assam, India
Dr. Matt Hayward, Australian Wildlife Conservancy, Wentworth, Australia
Dr. Justus Joshua, Green Future Foundation, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
Dr. Honnavalli N. Kumara, SACON, Anaikatty P.O., Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. Tom McCarthy, Panthera, New York, USA
Dr. H. Raghuram, The American College, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India
Dr. Don E. Wilson, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, USA

Other Disciplines
Dr. Rauf Ali, Foundation for Ecological Research, Vazhakulam, Pondicherry, India (Invasive species, Climate Change)
Dr. Aniruddha Belsare, Columbia MO 65203, USA (Veterinary)
Dr. Seema Bhat, Independent Consultant, New Delhi, India (Communities)
Dr. R.G. Jani, Anand Agricultural University, Anand, Gujarat, India (Veterinary)
Mr. Arun Kanagavel, WILD, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India (Communities)
Dr. K. Praveen Karanth, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India (Molecular)
Dr. Gowri Mallapur, Madras Crocodile Bank Trust, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India (Veterinary)
Ms. Payal Molur, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India (Communities)
Dr. L.D. Singla, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana, Punjab, India (Veterinary)
Dr. Jayshree Vencatesan, Care Earth Trust, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India (Communities)
Dr. G. Umapathy, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India (Molecular)

 

Mission, Values and Philosophy

The mission of the Journal of Threatened Taxa (JoTTis to serve the biodiversity community of researchers and conservationists by providing quick & easy access to peer-reviewed publications critical to their respective fields—for conservation and/or for academic research & interest. 

JoTT is established to promote biodiversity conservation and allied fields including and not restricted to taxonomy, ecology, disease, surveys, assessments, management, etc. at absolutely no cost to the wildlife community, scientists, academics, educators, policy makers, managers, and the general public.

JoTT does not charge a fee of any kind to publish.  It follows the 'Platinum Open Access' standards where authors are not charged for publications and readers are not charged for subscription. There are no processing fees, page charges or any other hidden charges.

JoTT strives to maintain high scientific standards in this regard, encourages a broad stream of subject areas, authors, global participation and publications without bias or prejudice.

JoTT does not promote exclusivity in its choice of publications or pursue popular practices to build up the journal marketing benchmark of higher impact.

JoTT does not select manuscripts to publish with marketing intensions at the cost of invaluable data to science.

JoTT mentors new entrants and others in publishing scientific articles of high standard through the participation of several volunteer scientists (for peer review & editing) from around the world.

JoTT helps with English language editing of articles, to those in need of such assistance and from non-native English speaking countries, to bring it to standards of adequate communication.

 

Article processing charges

1. Publishing in JoTT is absolutely free.
2. There are no submission charges to publish in JoTT.
3. There are no publication or page charges or membership fees charged at any time for publishing in JoTT.  There are no hidden charges!
4. There are no subscription or download charges in JoTT.
5. All publications in JoTT are completely Open Access and are available as HTML and PDF downloads.
6. Withdrawal of manuscript from publication after two weeks from the date of submission will be with a penalty of USD 10/- per page (authors residing outside of India), or INR 500/- per page (for authors residing within India) as indicated in the Checklist (of total pages submitted in A4 size page as per standard JoTT format, including text and illustrations) will be deposited before the submission is considered withdrawn. This is to ensure that the free services of JoTT and that of its editorial board are not misused.  In genuine cases requests will be considered for withdrawal without penalty, but adequate and compelling justification is required.

 

Copyright

Authors own the copyright to the articles published in JoTT.  This is indicated explicitly in each publication. The authors grant permission to the publisher Wildlife Information Liaison Development (WILD) Society to publish the article in the Journal of Threatened Taxa. The authors recognize WILD as the original publisher, and to sell hard copies of the Journal and article to any buyer. .JoTT is registered under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY), which allows authors to retain copyright ownership.  Under this license the authors allow anyone to download, cite, use the data, modify, reprint, copy and distribute provided the authors and source of publication are credited through appropriate citations (e.g., Son et al. (2016). Bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) of the southeastern Truong Son Mountains, Quang Ngai Province, Vietnam. Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7): 8953-8969; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2785.8.7.8953-8969). Users of the data do not require specific permission from the authors or the publisher.